Commission of Bullies and Chaos

Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities – a commission that sounds as if it’s diverse, inclusive and collaborative has proven to be something else.  It has been a commission of bullies who falsify information to the public.

About the Commission page

  1.  I have requested meeting minutes be posted their website.  The Commission responded that it was up to the city to post the minutes, that they had been submitted.
  2. I requested copies of the meeting minutes through City of Seattle Public Records Request for the minutes from June 2017 through March 2018.  My response was returned “The records you requested have not been created and finalized by the commission because of lack of a quorum.  As a result, there are no existing records that match your search.”  (Office for Civil Rights)
  3. How is a city commission able to function for over 8 months without a quorum and also elect new co-chairs?  How can they function without meeting minutes?

This Commission needs to have some direction and oversight.  It is run by people of questionable motives with little understanding of some of the real issues facing our community members with significant cognitive and developmental disabilities.

My experience with this Commission has only been since July, 2017 when I found out about their agenda to eliminate special certificates .  By the time I had any information on this there had already been work done through the Office of Labor Standards. While I know there have been and still may be some people with integrity on the commission, they are not the ones that are making decisions and speaking on behalf of this commission.

From what I have seen since July 2017 bullying and causing chaos have been the behaviors that have been accepted by the commission.  The Commission roster has changed and there are new co-chairs.

Without having a quorum for at least 8 months I’m very curious how decision have been made and why there has not been a quorum.  How can new co-chairs be elected without a quorum?  What guidelines does this commission follow in managing their meetings and work?

April 30, 2018  –  Shaun Bickley (apparently co-chair) and Jessica Williams-Hall terms expire.

Meet the Commissioners April 2018

commission PwD roster changes 2017 through 2018

 

 

“We Did It” (not)

We did it

Seattle passes elimination of special certificates – leads to job losses for people with disabilities

Injustice – this law certainly is.  It was propelled through a rapid process with little thought, planning or research done.   The backers of it told half-truths at best to out-right lies about the people it affected, will affect and their research.  They refused to answer critical questions from concerned advocates and community members, harassed and wrote libelous comments about people who disagreed with their “cause.”

One would think that the Seattle Commission would be a little more concerned about the fall-out from their victory – but given that the Commission has no clue about what it takes for job development, job skill building, appropriate supports and funding for those supports too be sustained, they apparently think that magic will happen and jobs will appear because of this law.  They think their job is done.

Now we can clean up their mess. 

The 2017 Commission for PwD had an Employment Committee with some great goals – although elimination of the special certificates was not among those goals.  I’m not sure when and how that became the goal but it appears that the other goals were forgotten.

Employment Committee

The fact that the Commission for PwD has no follow up or evaluation process it is up to others to do that.  The lies continue – coming from both people on the commission and the Mayor.

Since the Commission for PwD no longer has an Employment Committee, they can sit back and pat themselves on the back for their wonderful work.   I think they need to be held accountable to their actions  – I’m trying to get the information out but it’s hard when I’m blocked and censored.

My son and I went to their meeting yesterday to give a Public Comment to The Commission for People with Disabilities April 19 2018.  Even though we were there at the published time for the start of the meeting and public comments, the Commission was already on their 3rd or 4th agenda item, no sign in sheet and no acknowledgement.

They make it very difficult to be involved in processes which affect our community members – curious how they think they are meeting their purpose of accountability and working with the community on issues that concern them.

accountable to community

Below are just a couple of the outright lies that the now Co-Chair of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities wrote:

“The Commission IS disabled people, half with I/DD, several with intellectual disabilities.  We had testimony from disabled people and family members across the city, all in support.  We have already worked with the families and employers affected by this legislation, all of whom supported and consented to it.  

Don’t make assumptions and assume the disabled people are too stupid to decide what we need or to collaborate with other disabled people.”

 

“That’s why the rule change, proposed and advocated for by people with I/DD is so fantastic.  Your assumptions are just that:  assumptions that have no basis in fact.  I’m not college-educated and we have multiple members with ID and I/DD – just because you don’t agree with our conclusions doesn’t invalid our experiences.  

BTW, we worked not just with disabled community members but with the workers, their families, and employers, all of whom agreed to this change, none of whom are losing their jobs.  Please don’t make assumptions about us or decide what we need without talking to us. “

Seattle Commission issues apology

Update (October 12, 2017) 

I have been asked by some commissioners to file a formal complaint with the City of Seattle regarding the abusive nature of interactions between a particular member of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities and community members and organizations who had a concern. 

If you or others you know felt that a member of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities was abusive or inappropriately criticized you in their response to you, I have been asked to send a formal complaint to both the Commission and the Office of Civil Rights – Seattle Department of Civil Rights – complaints Thank you.

 

This past week a representative from the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities sent an apology to me for being banned from their Facebook page by one of the page administrators.

According to the representative, the page administrator took things way too far.  Because of this incident, they have instituted a temporary social media policy and reassigned roles.  The Commission will be formally adopting a policy in October.  Until that time, you and another have been “unbanned.”

The commission will, however, be moderating the page tightly and will remove posts that become “inflamed” or that attack another.  You and Friends of Fircrest, were attached because of one person’s vociferous opinion about Fircrest and his mixing his personal opinion with that of the Commission (which has not yet taken a position.)

 

I appreciate the acknowledgment of the censorship and accept the apology.  I do hope to be able to attend upcoming meetings to provide another voice to the conversation.

We need to have these conversations to build a stronger community.

Elimination of Sub-minimum wage in Seattle

The Seattle Commission for People with disAbilities  has made a recommendation to the Seattle City Council to eliminate certificates which enable employers to pay people with specific disabilities a commensurate wage.  I know that there are discussions all across the country that are looking at issues of employment and wages for people with disabilities.

This is a quick update on this very heated discussion.  From what I can assume by the articles that I read and the correspondence I have had with at least two of the commissioners regarding this issue vie Facebook,  there has been little research or collaboration with those in our community who may be, now or in the future, affected by this proposal.

Attempts to offer insight, requests for research, transition plans and funding plans have been ignored and people who expressed concerns have been rudely and aggressively mistreated by at least one of the commissioners.

Seattle Commission for people with disabiltiies Shaun Bickley and Cindi Laws

Below is the first letter that I submitted on the Facebook page.  This led to the Facebook page administrator blocking me from further comments or reacting to any posts – and this post was removed.

I am the parent and guardian of a young adult with significant intellectual/developmental and mental health disabilities – all of a degenerative nature and I network with many other families, caregivers, guardians and people with IDD who totally disagree with the assumptions that you and others are making about those with disabilities.

Yes, the members of the commission may have disabilities but is the specific population of those with significant intellectual/developmental disabilities represented?  The population which identifies as disabled is extremely heterogeneous and we need to have choices available to ensure that all have a chance and opportunity to work. We are all very concerned regarding this issues. For many of these people who work under these certificates it’s not about making a living wage – it’s about having a job and being a member of the community, participating, sharing experiences and having daily goals and activities – basically adding meaning to their lives. 


Unfortunately, my son and others who experience some of the same types of issues he does, are not able to articulate their ideas, attend meetings, and speak in coherent sentences – even with the help of assistive technology, and so their voices are not heard. 


You do not speak for them – in fact, it is quite the opposite because you deny the people who know, love and understand them, the opportunity to provide their ideas and choices. These people are their friends, families, guardians, caregivers, coaches, case managers, co-workers. These are the people who are all better equipped to fill in and be a proxy for their voices. 


The fact that you make assumptions that you are speaking for all people with disabilities without taking into consideration those who are affected by this issue is an act of discrimination and devaluation of their personhood. 


We need these certificates to ensure choice – remember the saying “nothing about us, without us” – Please take it to heart!

Mr. Shaun Bickley, one of the commissioners, took offense with my letter, stating “”nothing about us, without us” refers to disabled people, not to parents, siblings, neighbors,  co-workers and other allies”.  He wrote that they (the commission) were all disabled and therefore can speak for all people with disabilities – whereas, guardians’ concerns are only self-serving.  He wrote that all people, even if they can just move one muscle, can make their choices known – regardless if others understand them or not.  (I am very confused by this since if others do not understand, how are their choices known?)

In looking at the members of the commission I noticed that several are lawyers, a few have PhDs and several others have a variety of advanced college degrees, one is a filmmaker and an artist,  one is a medical doctor  – I’m curious which one has an intellectual/developmental disability?  This is the question that got me blocked from the Facebook page as it was seen as using “degrading language and making people feel unsafe.”

More to come – letters have been sent to The Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities, the Mayor’s office, the Office of Labor Standards and to each member on the Seattle City Council.