Abuse and Neglect in the Hospital

I am beside myself with anger, frustration and helplessness regarding the situation with our friend, Kevin.
Kevin has not been “on hold” in the ER at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Washington since April 24, 2019 (for this episode)

PeaceHealth

Below are messages that I received from Kevin’s mom and legal guardian last night and this afternoon.  Kevin is a 26 year old young adult.  Kevin is autistic and is a vulnerable adult with a legal guardian.

“Cheryl, the hospital let Kevin leave the hospital and he was on scrubs and no shoes running down one of the busiest streets in town. He made it to the respite bed where he was a couple of weeks ago. He ran in the middle of cars for 2 miles. They called me and let me know he was there, the hospital called me after the respite bed told them he was there. He had blood blisters in his feet. Then they had the audacity to tell Tom (respite care administrator) that Kevin checked himself out of the hospital. The police came later and took him.

“The police took him back to the hospital and told the ER manager that Kevin is gravely disabled and should not be let go in streets like this.

I have asked for a DMHP assessment, but they are giving me the run around

He has blisters on his feet and sticks stuck in his skin – the doctor is supposed to see him sometime today.

They just called me and said they will let him leave again. I guess the DMHP assessment was not done because it was done when he first got to the ER.

It’s a never-ending mess.”

I went to the Bellingham police station and they said that when they drop him off at the ER they let the hospital know that he is a danger to himself and others and needs to be in involuntary confinement.  The hospital disagrees.  I hope he does not escape again tonight – it was a miracle that he didn’t get hit by a car yesterday.

This ongoing nightmare has been reported to the DD Ombudsman, Adult Protective Services, the Department of Health and Developmental Disabilities Administration yet no action is taking place and the hospital is continuing to neglect Kevin and put his life at risk.

As a mother, nurse and advocate I am totally appalled and sickened by the lack of attention and concern that these state agencies, which are there to provide protection and care and the hospital which is to provide safe, appropriate healthcare continue with this neglect.

This is more than insane – is anyone listening?  Does anyone have any solutions?

Kevin’s mother has requested over and over again to allow Kevin to return to Fircrest Residential Habilitation Center (one of our States’ Intermediate Care Facilities) but DDA has continued to refuse saying there are no beds.  If this is an entitlement and there is “no refusal” how can DDA say there are no beds?

Is the only choice to let the hospital and state agencies continue to neglect their duties until Kevin runs into the street and gets killed by a car?  Then what?

Susannah Frame – King 5 Investigator – Please read this and help!

 

Kevin is trapped!

Many have been following the issues of those with IDD who have been dropped off and abandoned by their group homes into the hospitals.  This is not a new issue but one that has finally been acknowledged as happening.  We need a solution  – NOW

Recently, Keven, our 26 year old friend has been “on hold” in the Emergency room at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Bellingham, WA.  I sent an online complaint to the Washington DD Ombudsman and maybe the more complaints they receive, the better the chance at a positive solution – not only for Kevin but for others.

Here is the information that I submitted on my complaint – feel free to submit your own complaint regarding the issues that are happening. DD Ombuds complaint submitted May 6 2019

Today, Kevin’s mom informed me of the following information she received:

Kevin’s situation…

This afternoon after visiting Kevin at St. Joseph Hospital, I was told that if he attempts to leave the unit (SECU).

.. they will let him leave the hospital and 911 will be called.

When is this nightmare going end??

 

 

Kevin has been stuck in the hospital for 31 days – and counting

Kevin has been in St. Joseph Hospital for 31 days

My son Kevin is a 26 year old man with severe autism and he is developmentally delayed (around 5 years old developmentally). Kevin has been in a Bellingham group home for the last four years (Access Living). Before that, he was a resident at Fircrest RHC in Shoreline for five years. For the last six months Kevin has been having behavioral problems. His psychiatrist attempted to adjust his medications with no positive results. Now we know the behavioral problems were the result of increased ammonia levels due to a couple of his medications. For months he has been frustrated, sleeping all day and awake all night. Kevin has a history of poor self-regulating skills and can lose control and throw a tantrum when under stress. He is 6′ 2″ and during these instances he can harm those around him. My son has assaulted his caregivers and his roommates several times in the last six months. Each time the police were called and he was handcuffed and sent to the ER at St. Joseph Hospital. Once the crisis is over, promptly he feels bad and goes back to being a kind, loving child.

In November he was at the hospital for five days due to self-harming behaviors and hitting one of the caregivers. Again in January 7th he became anxious and hit a caregiver and a wheelchair bound roommate. Police were called and Kevin was taken to the ER. He was transferred to SECU in a room with another four patients. This unit is an extension of the ER, where patients with violent behaviors are placed on hold. Definitely not a good place for an autistic individual due to the loud screaming and the aggressive behaviors of patients around. When I went to the hospital he was crying, very scared, and asking to go home. I took him home with me and when I called his group home the next day, they let me know that he was not allowed to come back to his house. (Access Living wants to work with us and is attempting to rent a new house where Kevin can have his own space).

Kevin was with his father and I for two days as we were attempting to take care of him in our home until a new living situation was arranged. Sadly, he became agitated the third night because he wanted to go to his home in Bellingham. After he threw chairs and pushed his father and I, sadly we were not able to help him settle down. We were forced to call 911 at he was taken to the hospital again. He was in SECU that night and the next day he was transferred to a medical care unit. He has been there since the 10th.

We have been trying to get help from DDA but they have no answers. I contacted the admissions office at Fircrest on January the 11th and was informed that there was a great chance of them to accept Kevin on one of their respite beds since he was a Fircrest resident in the past. I informed Kevin’s care manager, but he let me know that it was out of his hands and the paperwork needed to be reviewed first by a DDA committee in Everett. It took from January 10th until February 4th for the file to be sent to Fircrest to apply for a respite bed. I called the person in charge of Kevin’s case in the Everett DDA office on 2/5 and he let me know that there are no respite beds available “anywhere” for my son at this time. We are desperate at this point, as the hospital is not the best place for an individual like Kevin.

St. Joseph Hospital staff have been great with my son (I work on the same floor as a floor RN), but Kevin will be better served in a place where he can go outside for walks and have more freedom to ambulate. He is in his hospital room 24/7 and this is harmful to his mental/emotional stability. The only good news is a new psychiatrist who is an expert on autism took Kevin’s case and she has changed his medications due to toxicity found in his blood work. We have already seen remarkable positive changes in his behaviors but the last four days he has started to do self-harm due to the stress of being confined for such a long time.

We feel helpless and discouraged since we are not able to help our child. Putting Kevin through this experience is wrong! More has to be done to help DD patients and their families during crisis situations like this. Please feel free to share our story, Kevin deserves better from the system.
Marcie Alspaugh

Addendum:  Video from June 2014 with footage of Kevin while he lived at Fircrest – Kevin is seen at 1:12 and 1:26 in this short video:

Recovered Wages for Caregivers

The Seattle Office of Labor Standards recovers more than $120,000 in minimum wage violations for Seattle home care providers

Below is the press release from Seattle Office of Labor Standards.  I do think the headline is misleading – it is not Seattle home care providers but only the caregivers who were employed by Aacres, WA, LLC – a for-profit supported living agency.  

you work for peanuts.jpeg

There has been a history of violations with this company – many coming from not paying their employees appropriately and understaffing with a high staff turnover rate and lack of nurse delegation services.

Aacres,, WA LLC had at least $40,200.00 in civil fines for several violations of care between June 11, 2018 and October 17, 2018.  Many of these violations repeat violations cited in previous investigations in the past year.

 

Seattle – (January 25, 2019) – The Seattle Office of Labor Standards (“OLS”) announces a $120,050 settlement with Aacres WA, LLC, a company that provides supportive living services to people with developmental disabilities. The OLS investigation found that Aacres failed to pay the correct minimum wage for 377 employees who worked or attended trainings in Seattle throughout 2017.

Alexander Njuguna is one of the workers benefiting from the settlement. “I am excited that we will get the money that is owed to us. There are so many workers over the years who complained about the injustice we faced. Being compensated will be good for all of us and reminds us that if someone does you wrong, and the law is in your favor, there can be justice. I would like to emphasize that all employees have rights and an employee should not be afraid to raise concerns in fear of retaliation by the employer.”

SEIU 775 represents more than 45,000 long-term and home healthcare workers in Washington State and Montana. “Thousands of SEIU 775 caregivers working in Seattle care for individuals with developmental disabilities in home care and supported living. Our Union works closely with employers and advocates to ensure that caregivers are treated with dignity and respect. Yet, in some cases, caregivers like other workers, aren’t treated fairly and aren’t paid what they are owed,” said Sterling Harders, SEIU 775 President. “OLS’ work to hold Aacres accountable and their fight to ensure no employer gets away with wage theft has a positive impact not just on our city’s workers, but on the level of care received by people with disabilities.”

Aacres recently announced that it was closing its King County operations after the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services cited them for serious deficiencies in care standards. A sister company, SL Start & Associates, was also shut down for violations of care standards. Aacres is a subsidiary of Spokane-based Embassy Management which is owned by a nationwide company, U.S. Community Behavioral, and New York-based private equity firm, Bregal Partners.

Please visit the OLS website for more information on Seattle’s Minimum Wage Ordinance and other labor standards.

Below is an excerpt regarding the recent (April 2018) de-certification and closure of SL Start Supported Living Services:

SL Start and Aacres are both owned by the same company—Spokane-based Embassy Management. According to business filings in Washington and Delaware and news reports, Embassy Management is a subsidiary of U.S. Community Behavioral, which in turn is owned by Bregal Partners, a New York private equity firm.

Don Clintsman, the deputy assistant secretary of the Developmental Disabilities Administration, said he understood the concern about moving clients to a sister organization, but said the two entities are different.

“The expertise that Embassy has shown and that Aacres has shown in running a supported living program give us confidence the SL Start residents will get the right service,” Clintsman said.

Excuse me – what EXPERTISE did Aacres have in running a supported living program?

Were the violations that had been accumulating mean anything to DDA?

VAPO – does not protect against predators

draft vapo amendmentWashington State RCW 74.34 – The Vulnerable Adult Protection Order does not protect our vulnerable adult population from stalking or harassing predators.

We need to change this and amend RCW 74.34 to included stalking/harassment in the definitions of abuse.

This past year a woman became obsessed with our son, Thomas.  Thomas is a young adult living in Supported Living in our community.  She believed she and a famous musician were Thomas’ biological parents and they planned on taking legal action to “regain” custody of Thomas and move him into their home.  There were several attempts to abduct Thomas from his home.

An emergency temporary protection order was easily obtained (which she immediately violated several times) but when it came time to have the VAPO signed in court, the Judge could not sign it since stalking and harassment are not written into RCW 74.34

We need a legislative sponsor for this amendment – there is a draft bill already written

Cost of Deinstitutionalization

A quick review of the hospital data from the Washington State Hospital Association provided the information below.  Granted this is far from a thorough review of the information but it does provide some insight into the problem that has been addressed by the DD Ombudsman and the recent issue at Mason General Hospital regarding the “dumping” of people with IDD at the hospitals when community care providers are unable to provide the contracted care.

This data is only for numbers of people discharged (therefore does not include people in the Emergency Departments or people that were on “observation”).  It also does not state the reason for admission but does report the service provided.  For my review, I chose the service “Organic disturbances and Intellectual disability”

June 2017 – June 2018

total discharges 967
average cost per discharge $75,332
average number of days for each person 20.3
average cost per day $3,709

Total cost for the year for these 967 people who were discharged was

$72.8 Million Dollars

Wow – think how much better spent that money would be and how much better off these people would be if that money was used wisely for a full continuum of care – meaning the RHCs, local crisis stabilization, respite and supported living

This waste of money is what the “deinstitutionalization” craze has caused.  Since these costs are not paid for from the DSHS or DDA budget, they are not counted in the cost of care for those with IDD – If I am wrong about this, please let me know and show me the sources.

Critical Access Hospital used as “residence” – Abuse by DDA

This practice is finally being addressed.  Most recently, the case of using a bed in a Critical Access Hospital  as a “residence” for a man with a developmental disabilities. The man, a client of Washington State Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) developed some behavior issues.  A crisis evaluator responded and law enforcement transported the man to the local hospital for a medical evaluation.  The man was cleared medically to be released but the licensed home refused to take him back.

That means that without a safe and appropriate place to be released to, the hospital cannot release the man even though he is not in need of medical support services.

Read the Blog “Stuck in the Hospital – Mason’s Story”

My name is John Short and I am an Emergency Medicine Physician at Mason General Hospital in Shelton, Washington. The following is my first-hand account of an ongoing injustice perpetrated by the WA state government against a disabled person:

Since DSHS/DDA has failed to find housing for Mason, we are now in a position of providing it for him. These state agencies are well aware of the laws and are using them to force hospitals to become part of the housing “crisis plan”. Where does that leave hospitals such as ours that don’t have large facilities that can absorb the needs of such clients? “Housing” is not a reimbursable diagnosis and so it is very likely that MGH will receive no funds to cover Mason’s stay. Anyone who has received a hospital bill knows how much this means. This is not to mention the 24/7 security that has been hired by MGH which would not be covered even if there was a medical condition that we were treating.

I am fully aware of the views of Disability Rights Washington and Advocacy Agencies such as The Arc which push for deinstitutionalization – consolidation and closure of RHCs.  With policies such as those we end up with trans-institutionalization such as what is happening at Mason General Hospital in Shelton, WA.

This practice is abuse by DSHS/DDA – not only of Mason but of everyone in our state.  It is wasting time, money and resources while DSHS/DDA does nothing and forces others to do their job and a much higher cost – both money and human cost.

According to the reports, Mason had been in foster care and “aged out.”  It’s not as if the issues suddenly appeared – there should have been a transition plan in place and the new group home should have been well-staffed and knowledgeable on Mason’s care and support.  DDA clearly did not do their job before Mason ended up at the hospital.  He had only been at the new home 2 days before he was carted off by the Crisis Response and law enforcement to the hospital.

 

KOMO News report