Cost of Deinstitutionalization

A quick review of the hospital data from the Washington State Hospital Association provided the information below.  Granted this is far from a thorough review of the information but it does provide some insight into the problem that has been addressed by the DD Ombudsman and the recent issue at Mason General Hospital regarding the “dumping” of people with IDD at the hospitals when community care providers are unable to provide the contracted care.

This data is only for numbers of people discharged (therefore does not include people in the Emergency Departments or people that were on “observation”).  It also does not state the reason for admission but does report the service provided.  For my review, I chose the service “Organic disturbances and Intellectual disability”

June 2017 – June 2018

total discharges 967
average cost per discharge $75,332
average number of days for each person 20.3
average cost per day $3,709

Total cost for the year for these 967 people who were discharged was

$72.8 Million Dollars

Wow – think how much better spent that money would be and how much better off these people would be if that money was used wisely for a full continuum of care – meaning the RHCs, local crisis stabilization, respite and supported living

This waste of money is what the “deinstitutionalization” craze has caused.  Since these costs are not paid for from the DSHS or DDA budget, they are not counted in the cost of care for those with IDD – If I am wrong about this, please let me know and show me the sources.

Critical Access Hospital used as “residence” – Abuse by DDA

This practice is finally being addressed.  Most recently, the case of using a bed in a Critical Access Hospital  as a “residence” for a man with a developmental disabilities. The man, a client of Washington State Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) developed some behavior issues.  A crisis evaluator responded and law enforcement transported the man to the local hospital for a medical evaluation.  The man was cleared medically to be released but the licensed home refused to take him back.

That means that without a safe and appropriate place to be released to, the hospital cannot release the man even though he is not in need of medical support services.

Read the Blog “Stuck in the Hospital – Mason’s Story”

My name is John Short and I am an Emergency Medicine Physician at Mason General Hospital in Shelton, Washington. The following is my first-hand account of an ongoing injustice perpetrated by the WA state government against a disabled person:

Since DSHS/DDA has failed to find housing for Mason, we are now in a position of providing it for him. These state agencies are well aware of the laws and are using them to force hospitals to become part of the housing “crisis plan”. Where does that leave hospitals such as ours that don’t have large facilities that can absorb the needs of such clients? “Housing” is not a reimbursable diagnosis and so it is very likely that MGH will receive no funds to cover Mason’s stay. Anyone who has received a hospital bill knows how much this means. This is not to mention the 24/7 security that has been hired by MGH which would not be covered even if there was a medical condition that we were treating.

I am fully aware of the views of Disability Rights Washington and Advocacy Agencies such as The Arc which push for deinstitutionalization – consolidation and closure of RHCs.  With policies such as those we end up with trans-institutionalization such as what is happening at Mason General Hospital in Shelton, WA.

This practice is abuse by DSHS/DDA – not only of Mason but of everyone in our state.  It is wasting time, money and resources while DSHS/DDA does nothing and forces others to do their job and a much higher cost – both money and human cost.

According to the reports, Mason had been in foster care and “aged out.”  It’s not as if the issues suddenly appeared – there should have been a transition plan in place and the new group home should have been well-staffed and knowledgeable on Mason’s care and support.  DDA clearly did not do their job before Mason ended up at the hospital.  He had only been at the new home 2 days before he was carted off by the Crisis Response and law enforcement to the hospital.

 

KOMO News report

How to create a crisis – deny services

Way back in 2011 and 2012 when Washington State was “researching” issues related to caring for our DD population, there was a DD Task Force which met several times.  The goal was to discuss the future of DD Care in our state with emphasis on the consolidation and closure of the close the Intermediate Care Centers.

Several of the predictions I had and tried to communicate to other DD Advocates and legislators have come to fruition.  Please listen to the families who are the real experts and survivors.  Advocacy Agencies such as The Arc, Disability Rights Washington and other similar agencies which receive public funds to provide advocacy must abide by their  policies – policies which may not be in the best interest of those actually involved.

  •  SL Start and client neglect/abuse – I reported issues in August 2012 to the legislature.  Senator Adam Kline only provided ridicule and sarcasm in his response to me –

“But I suspect this won’t happen.  I could be wrong, but I suspect that this story’s real value to the RHC advocates is in its expected political effect.  It portrays the RHC families—even the residents—as pawns in a game in which the malevolent community advocates are the operators.  SL Start is the villain in this instance, maybe the Arc the next time, maybe the Governor.  And you are “silenced” by these conspirators.  The victims are rendered mute, while only the conspirators may speak.  The conspirators “manipulate some of our community members.”   Oh, please!”

Obviously, this Senator believes this situation is fabricated to make an issue.  I wish it was but it’s not. This Senator goes on to berate me for being an advocate for safe and appropriate care and categorizes me into the “pro RHC” side.  When will he and others realize that it’s not about sides – it’s about safe and appropriate care for each individual.

April 2018 Headline – Apparently I had some real information that needed some attention.  If only people had taken the time to listen, trauma could have been alleviated.

Washington Shuts Down Care Provider For Disabled Adults, Now Families Face Tough Decisions

Below is an excerpt from the blog post dated September 8, 2012.  I address the issue that DDA did not even consider the issue of DD clients using the hospital and ER as crisis care.

That comes from a different budget so it’s not a factor to DDA.  Well it should be because it greatly affects the PEOPLE involved in addition to adding overall cost to our state’s budget.

While the concept of the crisis team is good, why not use the facilities and services we already have in place to run this program out of? We have the space and expertise to do this already and it seems ridiculous to start a whole new program for something that we have which already works very well.

I believe this was also part of Julianne’s testimony and she is 100% correct in her assessments of the situation.

As a parent who has survived crisis after crisis, I can also tell you that you should look to the hospital emergency room data on how many people are taken there for crisis. I believe you will find a lot more information regarding where folks with developmental disabilities go when they have a crisis. I also know this is the case from working with other families and hearing their stories. Talk to the ER nurses at Seattle Children’s and ask them how many families bring their kids with DD (particularly autism) there for crisis intervention. Talk to the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit doctors, nurses, and staff and Seattle Children’s. I believe you will find staggering numbers. You will see a much different picture than one you may hear from DDD. DDD is not aware of many of these crisis admissions to the hospitals because they are not notified.

What about connecting the crisis care team with the local hospitals and emergency medical response systems? What about connecting with the Crisis Line? I know that not only in our family’s case but in many, many others, these are the systems which we accessed in times of crisis. These are the places in which we will be able to realize the extent of the crisis situation with people with DD.

Please read the report the DD Ombuds   published and consider the tasks outlined to address this critical problem.

Provide appropriate funding to community residential providers and support the ICF to provide appropriate care for DD clients in crisis.

Hospitals are not Community Living

The DD Ombudsman’s Office published the report “Stuck in the Hospital”

This report discusses the crisis situation that we have gotten ourselves into by not listening to the families, caregivers and people involved.   It has been known for some time that people are boarding in the emergency rooms and hospitals because there are no safe community options for them.

With the mindset and policy that refuses to acknowledge that the Intermediate Care Facility has a place in the continuum of care and admission to these potentially life saving communities is prohibited by the administration, we have developed a situation that is much worse.

Has DDA and the legislature willingly been closing their eyes to this situation?  The fact that there has been no tracking of this by DDA or by the hospitals is neglectful when trying to understand the needs of the population.

The trauma and cost that is wasted is horrendous.  Reading these stories makes me very angry and very sad.  I cannot imagine the trauma that these people have endured while “living” in the emergency room or hospital.

As a parent of a disabled child who also experienced some of this (but nowhere near the extent described in the report) I remember times of crisis when there was no place to go.

Extreme mania and psychosis caused medical complications which necessitated a medical hospitalization.   My son was loud, did not sleep, was hallucinating and would not stay in one place.  He paced the hospital halls with family or caregivers (not enough nurses to provide his care).  At one point, we were told that we needed to keep him in his room since he was scaring the other patients.  Clearly, they did not understand that confining him to his room would only agitate him more and cause more noise and activity that would be even more disruptive.

The inpatient psychiatric unit was not much better – while they were able to manage his mania/psychosis, they were not prepared to manage medical issues or understand his intellectual/developmental disability.

The option that was suggested by the discharge team from the psych unit was “call the police” for the next crisis – meaning that my son, at age 14, would be taken to jail.

Jails and hospitals should not even be a consideration for this population in crisis.

The only place that would have been appropriate to provide both the comprehensive care needed to stabilize my son was the ICF/IID – unfortunately, he was denied admission for at least one year after a request was made and consequently had several lengthy hospitalization before this was finally approved.

Thank you to the DD Ombuds for addressing this crisis situation and developing a plan for correction.  Now that it is acknowledged, a solution can be addressed.

 

 

Mental Age?

Motive asymmetry – the belief that one groups motives are driven by love, care and affiliation and the rivals are motivated by the exact opposite.  This term is generally referred to with regards to political conflict but I see fully activated in the issue of advocacy for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

It feels to me that motive asymmetry is at play with regards to trained self-advocates and parents/guardians/healthcare professionals/case managers/disability advocates when any topic related to care, support, employment, inclusion, residential settings and community environment are discussed.

As a parent/guardian/disability advocate, this concept is very clear to me since I have been told by many trained self-advocates that guardians are only self-serving. This is truly not my perspective at all but it is attributed to me since I am a guardian. One effective tool used to help bridge this conflict is to meet in person. Once you know the person, views and ideas may change. It is only by meeting people and working together as people, rather adhering to  inflexible ideologies, that we can break down these silos and make progress.

Mental age theory

Ivanova Smith has written an article in NOS Magazine regarding the issue of using “mental age” as a description for people who happen to live with an intellectual and developmental disability.  She states “We need to educate medical professionals that there are better and more respectful way to explain the needs of people with Intellectual/developmental disabilities. Difficulty doing specific tasks isn’t the same thing as being an actual child.”

I have never seen this description used to state that an adult with IDD is a child – they are adults who have a variety of support needs in many areas of life skills.  Using labels and descriptive terms for various ranks, steps or skill levels are used in all types of employment, school, sports and athletics,  and hobbies.  One must pass through step 1 to get to step 2.  This is a natural progression.  One need not necessarily master the step but at least have a passing effort before one is able to proceed or progress.  There could be many reasons for a rapid or slow progression through these levels.
People do not excel in all areas of life and do not need to be an expert in everything they attempt to have enjoyment and meaning from it. Also, people may “stall out” at one step and many years later may revisit and then gain more skills. This is not set in stone as it is a fluid process and there is always learning and progress occurring as people experience life. This progression is also true with developmental, emotional and maturity stages. It is not “good” or “bad” but just is.

I often hear that people do not like labels – but labels help us to learn and navigate life in so many ways. Think for instance of working in trades – there are labels applied to levels of skill development – apprentice, journeyman, master. One is not a better person than another by having a different label but has a different skill set. These labels help us, who may not be familiar with the work to be done, who we might want to seek out for consultation. Labels are not inherently bad but can be extremely useful in many situations.
I am asking for your input into how you, as a trained self-advocate, differentiate between people who may need an extreme amount of support to manage the daily activities of living versus someone who may only need some occasional guidance with specific areas? How do you, as a trained self-advocate, differentiate between someone who is unable to utilize public transportation and needs to be driven everywhere in a private vehicle versus someone who can navigate the city independently on public buses?
Or maybe you do not see the need to differentiate – if not, why not?

Please contact me Ivanova – I would love to meet with you in person.

Thank you – Cheryl Felak

 

Have you ever heard the phrase “that person has the mind of a five year old In an adult body?” It is something many adults with intellectual disabilities, like me, have to deal with. For years, medical professionals have told parents of newly diagnosed Intellectually disabled people that they would mentally be children for their entire lives.…

via Mental Age Theory Hurts People with Intellectual Disabilities — NOS Magazine

#inclusivity  #diversityisstrength  #YouAreTheChange  #beyondinclusion  #disabilityrights  #intellectualdisability   #disabilitysupport  #mentalage  #agetheory

 

Save Fircrest – Essential Supports

A bill has been passed to the Senate Floor to vote on closure of Fircrest School – one of our states Residential Habilitation Centers (RHCs).  The RHC houses two critical communities of care – a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) and an Intermediate Care Facility (ICF).

It is a fact that there does need to be some capital improvement to the facilities to provide a safe environment for the residents and this is why we support the Fircrest Master Plan Fircrest Master Plan A-2

The campus has been neglected in the capital budgets for years and this is one reason why there is a large dollar sign to this project.  When buildings are neglected, they deteriorate and become unsafe for residents.  This is the situation we face now.

This does not mean that the land should be sold and the residents forced from their homes and community.  It does provide opportunity to change and to make needed improvements and to re-access the needs.

These are the opportunities that we support:

Fircrest Master Plan Alternative A-2

Federally Qualified Healthcare Center with oversight provided by the Department of Health for Fircrest residents and adult residents in the state who live with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Collaboration with the University of Washington, Center on Human Development and Disabilities to provide specialized and comprehensive healthcare to community members.  This collaboration would also provide training for students in the healthcare professions.

Opportunities for improvement are not an option if 2SSB 5594 passes.  This bill seeks to close Fircrest and deny current and future residents access to the necessary supports.

We need to defeat 2SSB 5594 to protect out most vulnerable citizens.  Tell your Senator to Vote NO on 2SSB 5594.

 

Senate Health Committee Hears Bill which looks to close ICF/IDD

Today SB 5594 was had public comments in the Senate Health Committee (Washington State)

There are actually some wonderful new ideas expressed in this bill (Federally Qualified Comprehensive Community Healthcare Clinic!!) but plans  to consolidate  from a combined campus of a skilled nursing facility and an intermediate care facility to just a skilled nursing facility is troubling.  This is  not explicitly written in the language but it is clear this is the goal.

The bill states a building at Fircrest must be remodeled and updated to serve as a skilled nursing facility.  Other steps must be taken to consolidate other buildings and ensure residents are provided the opportunity to stay at Fircrest or move into the community.

Given that Fircrest will only have a skilled nursing facility, what will happen to the residents who are not eligible for those services but choose to stay at Fircrest in an ICF/ID?  The bill does not address this population that currently resides at Fircrest.

“Former Fircrest School residents who fail to succeed in the community may, after repeated failures, remain in the community or may choose to move to another residential habilitation center; however, former Fircrest School residents may not return to Fircrest School.”

The other HUGE issue is that the community is far from ready to be able to accommodate the needs of the number of residents who may choose to live off campus.  Already there is a long waiting list for housing, staff and other services.

The critical issue that needs to be addressed before any changes can be made is that of supported living wages and supports.  These wages and supports need to be appropriately funded to provide the services.  This is the system that will provide stability, success and sustainability to community residential settings and is the issue that needs to be addressed as a first step to any issues of consolidation of the intermediate care facility.