Senate Health Committee Hears Bill which looks to close ICF/IDD

Today SB 5594 was had public comments in the Senate Health Committee (Washington State)

There are actually some wonderful new ideas expressed in this bill (Federally Qualified Comprehensive Community Healthcare Clinic!!) but plans  to consolidate  from a combined campus of a skilled nursing facility and an intermediate care facility to just a skilled nursing facility is troubling.  This is  not explicitly written in the language but it is clear this is the goal.

The bill states a building at Fircrest must be remodeled and updated to serve as a skilled nursing facility.  Other steps must be taken to consolidate other buildings and ensure residents are provided the opportunity to stay at Fircrest or move into the community.

Given that Fircrest will only have a skilled nursing facility, what will happen to the residents who are not eligible for those services but choose to stay at Fircrest in an ICF/ID?  The bill does not address this population that currently resides at Fircrest.

“Former Fircrest School residents who fail to succeed in the community may, after repeated failures, remain in the community or may choose to move to another residential habilitation center; however, former Fircrest School residents may not return to Fircrest School.”

The other HUGE issue is that the community is far from ready to be able to accommodate the needs of the number of residents who may choose to live off campus.  Already there is a long waiting list for housing, staff and other services.

The critical issue that needs to be addressed before any changes can be made is that of supported living wages and supports.  These wages and supports need to be appropriately funded to provide the services.  This is the system that will provide stability, success and sustainability to community residential settings and is the issue that needs to be addressed as a first step to any issues of consolidation of the intermediate care facility.

ActionDD – what are your goals?

ActionDD, a grassroots organization in Washington State is holding a winter meeting and legislative reception on Tuesday February 7, 2017, in Olympia WA.

I understand the goals of this organization are to keep the RHCs open and I fully agree with that goal.  I know that we need to have a full continuum of care to provide the best and appropriate supports to people in the IDD population.

This population is also one that experiences a great healthcare disparity – no matter where one lives.  Residence in the RHC does not provide the healthcare and oversight that people are led to believe exists in that setting.  Does ActionDD address this issue?

My concerns regarding appropriate healthcare with oversight by healthcare professionals is critical to the management of the RHCs.  Currently there is no oversight of the healthcare by the Department of Health and quality standards for healthcare are lacking.

I understand people are afraid to call attention to issues of concern regarding the care in the RHC and often refer to the oversight as being above and beyond that of oversight in community settings.  People are afraid that any “bad press” for the RHC will encourage those opposed to a full continuum of care to point out these deficiencies.  That may be a risk but there is also a risk to keeping quiet and allowing neglect to occur.

I am guilty of feeling that fear.  My son was a victim of various forms of healthcare neglect while living at Fircrest.  The neglect was systemic and has left him with life long complications.  In my attempts to collaborate and have appropriate care provided, I was ridiculed and harassed by administration for my concerns. My concern for his healthcare was treading on their turn and they had no intention of collaboration.  My speaking out about the healthcare neglect has started to open up dialogue but there is a long way to go.

 

 

Preserve and build Respite and Crisis Stabilization

Time is running out – we need a YES Vote on SB 5243

 

save respite part 4 Please read and understand why a YES vote is critical to our families who need support. This bill helps to maintain and build respite and crisis stabilization services – how can an advocate be against this bill?

According to the Action Alert sent out by The Arc – Washington State they oppose this effort to preserve respite and crisis stabilization.  This bill is only aimed at preserving and building – not shutting down and limiting the few choices that our families have for respite and crisis stabilization.

It is time to question the motives of The Arc – Washington State and ask why they want to tear apart services.  Tearing down will only hurt those we are trying to help.

Please call the toll-free hotline at 1-800-562-6000 and ask your Senator to vote YES on SB 5243 – it is for the sake of our families!

Read the bill here and decide for yourself what is in the best interest of our families and community members in need of services.

(1)(a) The Yakima Valley School shall continue to operate as a residential habilitation

The Yakima Valley School must operate crisis stabilization beds and respite service beds as the capacity of the school allows and as the needs of the community require, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose.
(b) As of the effective date of this section, no new long-term admissions are permitted.
(2) The department, within available funds:
(a) Shall establish state-operated living alternatives, within funds specifically provided in the omnibus appropriations act, to provide community residential services to residential habilitation center residents transitioning to the community under chapter 30, Laws of 2011 1st sp. sess. who prefer a state-operated living alternative. The department shall offer residential habilitation center employees opportunities to work in state-operated living alternatives as they are established;
(b) May use existing supported living program capacity in the community for former residential habilitation center residents who prefer and choose a supported living program;
(c) Shall establish up to eight state-staffed crisis stabilization beds and up to eight state-staffed respite beds based upon funding provided in the omnibus appropriations act and the geographic areas with the greatest need for those services;
(d) Shall establish regional or mobile specialty services evenly distributed throughout the state, such as dental care, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and specialized nursing care, which can be made available to former residents of residential habilitation centers and, within available funds, other individuals with developmental disabilities residing in the community; and
(e) Shall continue to provide respite services in residential habilitation centers and continue to develop respite care in the community.”

This is how 2SSB 5243 currently reads. Please read and understand why a YES vote is critical to our families who need support. This bill helps to maintain and build respite and crisis stabilization services – how can an advocate be against this bill?
(1)(a) The Yakima Valley School shall continue to operate as a residential habilitation

The Yakima Valley School must operate crisis stabilization beds and respite service beds as the capacity of the school allows and as the needs of the community require, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose.
(b) As of the effective date of this section, no new long-term admissions are permitted.
(2) The department, within available funds:
(a) Shall establish state-operated living alternatives, within funds specifically provided in the omnibus appropriations act, to provide community residential services to residential habilitation center residents transitioning to the community under chapter 30, Laws of 2011 1st sp. sess. who prefer a state-operated living alternative. The department shall offer residential habilitation center employees opportunities to work in state-operated living alternatives as they are established;
(b) May use existing supported living program capacity in the community for former residential habilitation center residents who prefer and choose a supported living program;
(c) Shall establish up to eight state-staffed crisis stabilization beds and up to eight state-staffed respite beds based upon funding provided in the omnibus appropriations act and the geographic areas with the greatest need for those services;
(d) Shall establish regional or mobile specialty services evenly distributed throughout the state, such as dental care, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and specialized nursing care, which can be made available to former residents of residential habilitation centers and, within available funds, other individuals with developmental disabilities residing in the community; and
(e) Shall continue to provide respite services in residential habilitation centers and continue to develop respite care in the community.”

This is how 2SSB 5243 currently reads. Please read and understand why a YES vote is critical to our families who need support. This bill helps to maintain and build respite and crisis stabilization services – how can an advocate be against this bill?
(1)(a) The Yakima Valley School shall continue to operate as a residential habilitation

The Yakima Valley School must operate crisis stabilization beds and respite service beds as the capacity of the school allows and as the needs of the community require, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose.
(b) As of the effective date of this section, no new long-term admissions are permitted.
(2) The department, within available funds:
(a) Shall establish state-operated living alternatives, within funds specifically provided in the omnibus appropriations act, to provide community residential services to residential habilitation center residents transitioning to the community under chapter 30, Laws of 2011 1st sp. sess. who prefer a state-operated living alternative. The department shall offer residential habilitation center employees opportunities to work in state-operated living alternatives as they are established;
(b) May use existing supported living program capacity in the community for former residential habilitation center residents who prefer and choose a supported living program;
(c) Shall establish up to eight state-staffed crisis stabilization beds and up to eight state-staffed respite beds based upon funding provided in the omnibus appropriations act and the geographic areas with the greatest need for those services;
(d) Shall establish regional or mobile specialty services evenly distributed throughout the state, such as dental care, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and specialized nursing care, which can be made available to former residents of residential habilitation centers and, within available funds, other individuals with developmental disabilities residing in the community; and
(e) Shall continue to provide respite services in residential habilitation centers and continue to develop respite care in the community.”

We need to provide choices – not restrictions

Please view the video which highlights the need for choices and options in our efforts to provide services and appropriate care and homes for those who live with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  This is one example of many that need to be options allowed and promoted.

 

 

Catch 22 – The Arc “issue”

I recently came across an article written by Irene Tanzman on LinkedIn entitled “Advocacy Organization Catch 22” published June 22, 2015.  I would encourage reading this and in addition taking a look at some of the other insightful articles that she has published.  I felt a breath of fresh air when I first read this yesterday.

There are many concerns regarding “The Arc Issue” as I will call it.  In addition to the facts that Ms. Tanzman has addressed it is important to realize that in order for a chapter to call itself “The Arc” that chapter needs to be aligned with the agenda and policies of the national organization.   Every local and state Arc sign an affiliation agreement with Arc US that the chapter will support the policies of Arc US.  if for some reason a chapter does not support a particular position they are to remain silent and not comment.   So, regardless of what is happening in your region or state, your local Arc can only speak on policies that are dictated from the national organization.

The national policy of The Arc US (taken many years ago in the late 70’s and early 80’s) is that “community” is best and ALL people can be served in the “community.”  There are many problems with this policy:

  1. It is outdated
  2. It is not in alignment with the 1999 US Supreme Court Decision Olmstead v. L.C.
  3. It is not person-centered
  4. It does not indicate why they think this is best, or how it will be achieved.

What are some of the solutions?

The Arc wants to eliminate respite care

There is so much that does not make sense but one of the top things with advocacy for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities is that The Arc of Washington is against a bill which will continue to provide much needed respite care for people in our communities.

This graph illustrates the number of community clients who receive care at our state’s Residential Habilitation Centers (RHCs).  SB 5243 aims to maintain Yakima Valley School for residents and respite clients.  The Arc of Washington opposes this bill.  Yakima Valley School serves an average of 32 community clients per month for respite  – without this resource our community members will have much less access to the already minimal respite care available.

Community Respite in RHCs

The Arc of Washington supported the closure of Frances Haddon Morgan Center (FHMC) in 2011.  Frances Haddon Morgan Center had a well respected and much used respite program.  Since the closure of FHMC in 2011, it is clear that the need for respite in other RHCs increased.

Please support SB 5243 and help reverse some of the damage done by the bill in 2011 which caused at least one death and led many other people into crisis.   Advocates should be looking at care, protection, choice and progress – not the opposite.  In my experience, The Arc of Washington is not acting as an advocate.

 

Data Retrieved from Developmental Disabilities Administration

Executive Management Information System

June 2010 – June 2014

 

The count for respite clients for each month is the unduplicated count of clients who accessed respite for the month. 

 2015 Developmental Disabilities Bills of Interest – published by The Arc of Washington State

King County DD Wrap up for The Arc of King County Legislative Forum 2014

Letter to King County Legislators – December, 2014  (letter sent as a wrap up after watching the forum on TVW)

Thank you very much for attending the King County Legislative Forum on November 24, 2014. I was unable to attend and present some information regarding critical needs and access to services for many in our communities but do appreciate the opportunity to share the information with you at this time.

With Governor Inslee’s budget proposal it is clear that we will again be looking at more cuts to services for people with Intellectual/developmental disabilities. It is critical to have accurate information regarding community care, respite, crisis care and cost of care in order to make informed decisions.

What is most concerning to me is that facts are not being shared regarding access to and cost of care – particularly for the much needed respite and crisis care. I have gathered the information below in hopes of sharing some solutions to the problem. You heard some heart wrenching stories, particularly from Janice Lawrence and Laura Jorgenson regarding lack of respite and crisis care. My family, too, has experienced these issues – my son faced jail as the only option left for “care” as a 14 year old with profound intellectual and developmental disabilities. Multiple and prolonged hospitalizations were our crisis care until the denial of services was able to be appealed and he was admitted and stabilized at a Residential Habilitation Center (RHC). I understand the agony of these families in trying to secure appropriate care for their children and I work hard to advocate for this care.

You may recall in 2011 our state passed 2SSB 5459. There was quite a bit of controversy regarding this bill for several reasons – mainly closing of the Frances Haddon Morgan Center (FHMC) based on “cost savings” which never materialized and a state law which goes directly against Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services admission of eligible clients into the Intermediate Care Facility for those with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/ID) or the Residential Habilitation Centers (RHCs). Washington State passed a law prohibiting those under 21 from admission to the RHC, regardless of choice and eligibility requirements being met.

The plan was to open up several crisis care centers for youth throughout the state. This plan was not fulfilled – again for several reasons but mainly because there was NO cost savings in closing FHMC from which these crisis care centers were to be funded.

Developmental Disabilities Administration was able to secure one home in Lakewood which can care for only 3 youth at a time. Since opening this Crisis Care Center (you heard one mother, Janice Laurence, talk about her son’s utilization of this center) in December 2012, 12 youth have been able to access these services. Of those 12, only one was able to return to the family home – all others either went to an RHC or a licensed residential home for youth. The daily cost of care in the Lakewood Crisis Stabilization is $1,165.

Frances Haddon Morgan Center (which today sits empty and unused) was able to care for about 22 respite clients per month for a cost of at a daily rate of $541 (federal and state costs combined) – clearly, utilizing the RHC for much needed respite was not only more cost-effective but much more accessible to our communities in need.

Data taken from the Executive Management Information System also clearly indicates how our RHCs serve those in our communities throughout our state. We often hear about the number of “permanent” residents in the RHCs but rarely hear about the much larger numbers of community residents who receive much needed crisis care and respite care. The community members served in our RHCs are more numerous than the numbers of permanent residents served in the RHCs. Also, the RHCs can provide this expert and comprehensive care at 46% of the cost for similar care at the Crisis Stabilization Center in Lakewood.

It only makes sense to continue to utilize the facilities we have and use them to capacity to best serve our communities in need. Closing or consolidating our RHCs is not the answer as evidenced by the wasteful “experiment” we have experienced due to passage of 2SSB 5456.

number of community members who access respite services

Average Daily Cost of Care for Respite

References:

Data received from the Department of Social and Health Services, Executive Management Information System with correspondence from Mark Eliason, DSHS Office Chief of Policy and Programs; Janet Adams, DSHS Quality Programs and Stakeholders Office Chief; Carol Kirk, DSHS RHC Program Manager; Monica Reeves, Monica Reeves, Crisis Services Program Manager.

DDA Policy regarding ICF/ID Admissions

Report to the Legislature – December 5, 2011

TVW.org 25th Annual King County Legislative Forum sponsored by King County DD and The Arc of King County

http://54.185.64.84/index.php?option=com_tvwplayer&eventID=2014110041