Fact or Fiction Part 2

cost center

“Average” Daily Rates in Washington State for residents with Developmental

Disabilities who live in 4 types of Supportive Residential Care

Regarding the cost of care, it is clear that the comprehensive cost of the care of those with the highest support needs who choose the RHC is the most cost effective care.  As revealed in the report “Assessment Findings for Persons with Developmental Disabilities Served in Residential Habilitation Centers and Community Settings” (2011) residents in RHCs had significantly higher support needs than community residents.  The RHC residents were also significantly more likely to meet both extensive behavior and extensive medical support needs than residents in community residential programs.  “Our current findings suggest very clear difference in medical support needs, with those in RHCs being more likely to have high medical support needs than those in community residential programs.” (Barbara A. Lucenko, PhD and Lijann He, PhD, 2011)

 

This report also examined the DDD Acuity Scales and found that the residents in the RHCs also  had significantly higher support needs in interpersonal support, protective supervision and Activities of Daily Living (personal care, dressing, bathing, eating) in addition to medical and behavioral support needs. 

 

 

Looking at the daily cost of care in each cost center, it is also clear that there is much cost shifting in some areas which make it appear that the cost of care is less expensive.  This is the information that is often not shared when comparing costs.  It is also critical to look at the support needs of the residents in each setting, realizing that those in the RHC have significantly higher support needs and inherently higher costs related to the higher support need.

 

One other area that is misrepresented is that the “community” ICF/IDs offer the very same services as the state run supported communities of the RHCs.  It is clear by auditing their costs that this is not the case.  Knowing the high support need of the average RHC resident, it is very clear that this average RHC resident could not be safely and cost-effectively cared for in the “Community” ICF/ID since the comprehensive services are only available in the RHC. 

Please see this link below for a description of the cost centers and more information on the data 

 Average Daily Cost of Care

Bibliography

Barbara A. Lucenko, PhD and Lijann He, PhD. (2011, February). Assessment Findings for Person with Developmental Disabilities Served in Residential Habilitation Centers and Community Settings. Retrieved from http://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/ms/rda/research/5/36.pdf

In Washington State the term Residential Habilitation Center (RHC) is inclusive of the ICF/ID and the specialized Nursing Facility.  The costs in these reports are only for the ICF/ID part of the RHC.

 

Children’s Mental Health and Developmental Disabilties

After watching the House Health and Human Services Appropriations and Oversight Committee Work Session from December 1, 2011, I really saw that the mental health folks are much more aware of the cross systems issues and the problem with “silos” that the DD folks seem to be unaware of.  DDD really needs to look again at the services that their clients receive and share accurate data.  The data they share is so full of inaccuracies that those who use DDD and DSHS data as their facts (The Arc Chapters) are only hurting the very people who they are advocating for.

 

This is clear by the crisis that we have dug ourselves into.  There was NO cost savings from closing Frances Haddon Morgan Center as many were led to believe.  Now instead of using that “savings” for more in the community setting, those who are in the “community” settings are going to lose even more – This treatment is inhumane and is done by the very agency that is set up to protect our most vulnerable.

 

I wish that members of the The Arc chapters would look at some of the data that I have been able to gather and realize that what DDD is giving them is misinformation.  Rather than censoring me or accusing me of abuse because I have questioned the DDD and DSHS reports, it would benefit all of us if someone would actually look at this data and realize that what I have is critical information.

 

The fact that my questions to the authors of some of these reports and the administrators in DSHS and DDD are not answered  should be a big clue that there is information there that they do not want to acknowledge – I would assume because it would show that they are not being truthful in their approaches to policy.  If they were , I believe they would gladly answer my questions or at least tell me that I’m wrong.  I’ve not heard that I’m wrong either.

 

If anyone would like that data, I’m more than willing to share.  The more who are aware of this and who understand it, the better for ALL people, with and without developmental disabilities.

 

I will be posting another letter with some very specific questions that DDD and DSHS need to answer.

Resident hours per day charts

 

Thank you,

DDD Costs of Care and Decisions which cost lives

Some decisions have been made which have cost people their lives – I’m hoping that before anymore lives are lost or hurt, our legislators will be given accurate data upon which to base their decisions.

This has not happened in the past due to ideology gone awry.  The cost reports for the care for our citizens with developmental disabilities has been falsified and reported inaccurately.  As a start to this, I have prepared the attached letter – it has a few charts and examples of where this reporting has really missed capturing the costs of care for some of our citizens with the highest acuities who chose to live in small community homes.  Remember, this is not the choice for everyone.

The RHC is the most COST EFFECTIVE environment of care for our citizens with the highest acuity.  Why, in times of budget crisis would people allow these misleading cost reports to guide them is beyond me – not only are we ending up spending more for less care but fewer and fewer people will be able to receive care too.

Please read the letter –  Comprehensive Cost comparison

Imprisonment for people, death to some – It’s coming down to that –

Our state is in a crisis – that’s not news to anyone.  Some of the crisis is self-made from some “advocates” who have pushed inaccurate information to our legislators.  The false information and reports based on inaccurate data were utilized in decision making – decisions that are now coming back to bite us.

There are some solutions but people will have to acknowlegde some mistakes that were made.  Here is just one solution – retention of Direct Support Staff –

We need to think of Quality of Life for our citizens with developmental disabilties.  Having staff turnover rates up up to 44% is not only disturbing but dangerous and expensive.  Do you know that if we changed and tweeked the system just a little, we could save over $28,000,000 and improve the quality of life not only for residents but also for caregivers?

Do you know that moving some residents to small community homes will be imprisonment for them?  Without staff to care for them or staff to take them to appointments and community outings, they will be imprisoned in their homes – is this the type of life that you would wish on anyone?

One can clearly see there is a huge problem: Not even taking into account the effect on residents and the loss of knowledge and skills in relating to residents when staff leave, the lack of continuity in care (all which add to stress and increased behavior issues in residents), all the other issues with staff turnover that are seen in the business world are seen here too.

On average it is concluded that it costs about the annual salary of the person to replace that person – so given that, how much money could be saved in retention of staff (increased wages would help and would clearly offset the cost of staff turnover) which would then improve the quality of life.

Group Home Direct Care Staff make roughly $10.00/hour (some more, some less range is $8.55 – 13.62 in 2010) so that calculates out to about $20,000 for each person – so for 2010 in group homes that comes to $2,100,000 dollars on just staff turnover!!!!

Supported Living is $28,900,000

Now those are some ridiculous numbers – One of the keys to this problem is to look at staffing and how to retain the staff – This is what will not only save money but  improve the quality of life for EVERYONE!!!

Now is the time to think about new systems  – think outside the box (sorry for the cliche)

 The data for this chart was obtained from the DDD Residential Programs Staffing Wage & Turnover Study, years 2008, 2009 and 2010

Type of Program 2008 2009 2010
Group Home 48.1 44.3 39.2
Supported Living 44.7 37.8 35.8
SOLA 18.9 14.9 14.4

DD Advocates need to come clean with accurate information!

It is critical to drop the adherence to the ideology that “community” living is best and less costly than living in an ICF/DD for many of our high needs citizens with developmental disabilities.  This dogmatic approach is hurting everyone of us – disabled or not.  A continuum of care model takes variety into consideration in addition to cost effectiveness, safety and quality.  A continuum of care model is what needs to be looked at – a model which benefits everyone – disabled or not.

Please see this link for information Come Clean.  This roughly outlines some of these issues.  Resources and accurate data taken from DDD and DSHS management sources.

 

Local News | What did and didn’t pass in Legislature this year | Seattle Times Newspaper

When I read this article and see no mention of SSB 5459 in this – I realize that the bill that was so critical in my mind was of little significance to the state as a whole.  I have a hard time coming to grips with this and then wonder, if this bill was of such little significance, why didn’t legislators listen to the sensible and responsible facts that were brought to their attention and vote NO on SSB 5459?  There must be another reason that overrode responsibility, basic human and civil rights, personal choice on residence as guaranteed under the Federal Olmstead decision and the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services guidelines.

If anyone could enlighten me as to what deals were made which caused this bill to pass I would love to know.  Maybe if I understood what was exchanged in order for a responsible, humane and sensible person to vote yes on this bill,  I could understand why innocent people were made scapegoats for such an “insignificant” bill.

Local News | What did and didn’t pass in Legislature this year | Seattle Times Newspaper.

Mama Bear is Showing Up!

Happy Mother’s Day –

Every one knows how ferocious a mama bear can be protecting her cubs and knows to get out of the way.  I’m feeling like that mama bear right now and getting madder and madder.  Someone is attempting to hurt my child – not just my child but the children of many of us and it’s time to step back or it won’t be pretty.

I’m tired of being nice and playing the game.  I’m tired of DDD case managers denying services to children and adults who are needing services and who are approved for those services yet DDD continues to deny them.  I’m tired of the  DDC acting as if they know what’s best for our most vulnerable citizens yet shunning and censoring information from the experts – parents and caregivers.  I’m tired of so-called “disability advocates” from The Arc chapters behaving as if they care about our most vulnerable citizens and I’m mostly tired of all people from those agencies deliberately causing harm to our citizens.

I can tell you that a DDD case manager wondered why I didn’t restrict fluids from my son so that he would not wet his bed.  This was not just a little wet, this was a monster wetting which necessitated laundering every bit of bedding every day due to being soaked.  This was not a case of simple bedwetting but a case of neurogenic bladder that only relaxed at night so that was the only time he could really empty his bladder – while he was asleep – the only time his body ever relaxed (that is if he did sleep.)

This is the same DDD Children’s manager who I overheard tell my son’s case worker “do not offer them anything.”  That was after a meeting I had with them while he was hospitalized his for the 5th time in Seattle Children’s Inpatient Psychiatric Unit, psychotic and manic.  We had looked at Fircrest for him, we and his healthcare team knew it would be the best place for him – particularly since we had been told that another hospitalization would not be approved.  Our son was 14 and the DDD Children’s manager said “DON’T OFFER THEM ANYTHING?”

What is wrong with this picture?  Whatever it is – it needs to change and I’m doing my best to make changes.  Just as Ed Holen and Sue Elliott from the DDC and The Arc say on their Olympia Insider videos on Youtube “Change is made by those who show up.”

I’m going to be showing up!