SEIU 775 spending to Restrict Caregiving

2008  Initiative 1029 –  Washington Long Term Care Initiative

total funds raised 1029

 

funds raised for 1029funds raised against 1029

 

2011 Initiative 1163 – Washington Long Term Care Initiative

total spent on 1163top contributor for 1163top contributor provided against 1163

 

2016 – Initiative 1501 – Washington Increased Penalties for Crimes Against Vulnerable Individuals

total funds spent initiative 1501

All in all, SEIU 775 funded the great majority for each of these three initiatives.  With misleading information in the titles and tag lines, it’s easy to see how voters were fooled.

The real people getting hurt are those who need care and those who want to provide the care.  There are TOO many barriers for the people involved in accessing the supports they need to remain in their communities.

 

total funds for all 3 initiativestotal funds spent against all 3 initiativesfunds spent for the 3 initiatives

 

Shame on Frame – King 5 “Investigative” report

Susannah Frame is doing a great disservice to our community. Her total lack of appreciation for the diversity of our population of citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities is more than problematic.   Without an understanding of this diversity one cannot even begin to understand the complexities involved in the care of our community members.  Below are some bullet points that need clarification from Ms. Frame:

  •  mentioned several times about biases in the “scientific studies” but fails to mention what those biases are.
  • refers to cost of care being less expensive in a community setting – but she has not explained what “cost of care” is or how it is measured.
  •  has not shown any indication that the cost of care is higher for those with higher support needs.
  • refers to the families who have had their loved ones in the RHCs for 20-30 years and are afraid – unaware that there are many young people who live in these therapeutic communities and many more who were denied this care.
  •  has not offered any solutions or real alternatives or how those alternatives could be achieved.
  •  seems unaware of the crisis in our community care system with so little oversight that many fear for their health, safety and lives in these community settings.
  •  has not addressed the issue of access to care in the community such as medical care and transportation.
  •  has not spoken with any of the agency service providers in the community about their inability to staff and appropriately care for an influx of people with very high support needs.
  •  has not addressed what a person’s community is and personal choice in making that decision.

If one is going to talk about de-institutionalization without addressing safe and appropriate supports in the community, this type of advocacy endorses neglect and risk for our most vulnerable citizens. The environment that is the Least Restrictive for that Person is the environment which allows that person to interact with and be part of the community to their fullest potential. As stated in the 1999 US Supreme Court Decision of Olmstead, for some that may be the institution.

The issues above need to be addressed and discussed in any conversation dealing with care of our loved ones. The answer is not arguing  “institution vs community” – the answer is to look at  the diversity of the population and understand their needed supports and then how to fund and maintain those supports.

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”  John Adams

Cost of Care

Yes, it is absolutely correct that DSHS costs for care in the RHC is greater than DSHS costs for care in a community setting. Looking only through the eyes of DSHS it would make sense to close the RHCs to save DSHS funds – but looking at the big picture of how things work that is exactly the opposite of what one should do if cost was a factor. .

Cost of care is one issue discussed  – but not what “cost of care” means for each setting nor the support needs of the residents in each setting.  The graph below is a good example of missing costs – but necessary costs for care.  Looking at the cost breakdowns for areas of care, it is clear the RHC provides a much more comprehensive package of care than the community settings.   The greatest cost of care in community settings is the personal care cost and for people with higher support needs, that personal care cost is extremely high as evidenced by the data from DDA.

RHC and Community Cost

All of these are included in the RHC Cost

Where are they in Community costs?

Other Costs

Resources:

Developmental Disabilities Administration. (2012). Cost of Community Clients with High Support Needs.

(2011). RHC Cost Details and Federal Reimbursement – CMS.

Community Cost of Care Reports, Public Disclosure Information Revealed. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.becausewecare1.com:https://becausewecare1.com/community-cost-of-care-reports-public-disclosure-information-revealed/

Clintsman, D. L. (2011). Assistant Director, Department of Social and Health Services. 30 Community DDD Residents – highest costing to DDD.

Atkinson, M. (2011). DSHS: Developmental Disabilities Services Overview. Office of Program Research and Senate Committee Services, Joint Legislative Task Force. Retrieved fromhttp://www.leg.wa.gov/JointCommittees/DDSSTF/Documents/Oct2011/DevDisabOverview.pdf

Barbara A. Lucenko, P. a. (2011). Assessment Findings for Persons with Developmental Disabilities Served in Residential Habilitation Centers and Community Settings. Department of Social and Health Services. Retrieved fromhttp://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/ms/rda/research/5/36.pd

Support Intensity Scale. (n.d.). Retrieved from American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities:http://www.siswebsite.org/cs/SISOnline

Division of Developmental Disabilities: Intake and Determination of Developmental Disabilities. (n.d.). Retrieved from Washington State Legislature: http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=388-823&full=true

(Data taken from Certified Residential Program Costs of Care Reports for 2010. The agencies from which data was retrieved:

Aacres WA, LLC – Tacoma Aacres WA, LLC Abbott House –  Alpha Supported Living – Ambitions of Washington – Region 4 Ambitions of Washington – Region 5-  The Arc of King County – The Arc of Spokane –  Bethesda Lutheran Communities Camelot –  Centerpoint Services –  Community Alternatives for People with Autism –  Community Homes –  Community Integrated Services –  Community Living – Bellevue –  Community Living – Kent/Auburn –  Community Living – Kent Intensive Community Living – Sunnyside –  Community Living – Yakima –  Destiny House –  Educational Programs in Home Living –  Friends of Families –  Friendship House –  Group Action for Peninsula People –  Harbor Alternative Living Assoc. – Inglewood Residential Services –  Integrated Living Services –  Kitsap Residences –  Kitsap Tenant Support Services –  Life Skills Center –  Maksu, Inc –  Premier Care Services –  Provail  – Puget Sound Regional Services –  ResCare –  Shamrock Living Services –  Shared Journeys –  SL Start – Grandview –  SL Start – Seattle –  SL Start – Spokane –  Stand Together Total Living Concepts (2010)

Is Washington State “decades” behind the times?

This has been an interesting week for TV Investigations into issues of care for our citizens with Intellectual Disabilities.

One deserves to be heard and is a real investigation into real and current issues of abuse and death of an innocent man who happened to live with an intellectual disability.  Well, the other report, is not really an investigation – at least not yet – but looking into what happened in the institutions over 40 years ago with video of the horrible conditions in bygone years.

Kudos to Tracy Vedder from KOMO News for her investigation into the death of Jessy  Hamilton and the total mistreatment of him while under the care of the court system.  Jessy’s death is a tragedy and could have been prevented if the judge, lawyer, Cetralia Police Department and the Developmental Disabilities Administration were capable of doing their jobs.

lhttp://www.komonews.com/news/investigations/AutismDeath.html

On another station, Susannah Frame of King 5 News has started her investigation series titled “The Last of the Institutions” with this video.

http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/investigations/2015/11/03/washington-state-developmentally-disabled-residential-habilitation-center/75065984/

Unfortunately, the information that Ms. Frame has shared is decades behind and not factual.  She has gathered her information from biased reports and has chosen to use video which does not depict our state’s therapeutic communities as they are today.  She has chosen to show one campus from a back gate separating the campus from a neighboring park – the only fence she could find on the campus.  When questioned about this blatant misrepresentation of what the campus looked like she wrote “it was the only public space they could find”.  Ms. Frame ought to know better – the campus itself is public property – no gates or fences – she could very well have chosen a setting to show what the campus actually looked like.

Washington STate DSHS did make a clarification of this shot on a comment on the King 5 Website:

DSHS Clarification of Fircrest Video by Susannah Frame

Ms. Frame states that there will be more coming in which she will delve into the various issues more thoroughly.  My hope is that she has facts – not just wishful thinking.

I will be following the “investigation” closely and adding comments here and on King 5 Facebook and website.  I will provide facts and resources.

The issue is not “community” vs “institution” but about how are state can provide quality care to those who need it bases on their support needs and their choice.

We are way ahead of other states but we do need to have better quality of care, better oversight in the community, better pay for caregivers and better training and support.  Continuing to keep the “community” vs “institution” issue as a focus will only detract from what we really need to look at and investigate.  This is irresponsible reporting.

Catch 22 – The Arc “issue”

I recently came across an article written by Irene Tanzman on LinkedIn entitled “Advocacy Organization Catch 22” published June 22, 2015.  I would encourage reading this and in addition taking a look at some of the other insightful articles that she has published.  I felt a breath of fresh air when I first read this yesterday.

There are many concerns regarding “The Arc Issue” as I will call it.  In addition to the facts that Ms. Tanzman has addressed it is important to realize that in order for a chapter to call itself “The Arc” that chapter needs to be aligned with the agenda and policies of the national organization.   Every local and state Arc sign an affiliation agreement with Arc US that the chapter will support the policies of Arc US.  if for some reason a chapter does not support a particular position they are to remain silent and not comment.   So, regardless of what is happening in your region or state, your local Arc can only speak on policies that are dictated from the national organization.

The national policy of The Arc US (taken many years ago in the late 70’s and early 80’s) is that “community” is best and ALL people can be served in the “community.”  There are many problems with this policy:

  1. It is outdated
  2. It is not in alignment with the 1999 US Supreme Court Decision Olmstead v. L.C.
  3. It is not person-centered
  4. It does not indicate why they think this is best, or how it will be achieved.

What are some of the solutions?

Happy ADA Anniversary – DDC Interview tomorrow!

ON this eve of my interview with the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council I am thinking of all the people who are not able to have their voices heard.  My hope is that the DDC does uphold the 1999 US Supreme Court Decision Olmstead v. L.C. and that they do honor person centered planning.

My hope is that they understand that “inclusion” is defined by the person and what is optimal for that person.  This has been a very difficult concept for many to understand.  Also, we need to take into consideration all the caregivers and support people and what “inclusion” means for them too.  We are all in this together and we need to work together for what is best for the whole.  Not everyone is going to get their way with everything but that does not mean that there are not success stories.

Updates after the interview –

The Arc wants to eliminate respite care

There is so much that does not make sense but one of the top things with advocacy for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities is that The Arc of Washington is against a bill which will continue to provide much needed respite care for people in our communities.

This graph illustrates the number of community clients who receive care at our state’s Residential Habilitation Centers (RHCs).  SB 5243 aims to maintain Yakima Valley School for residents and respite clients.  The Arc of Washington opposes this bill.  Yakima Valley School serves an average of 32 community clients per month for respite  – without this resource our community members will have much less access to the already minimal respite care available.

Community Respite in RHCs

The Arc of Washington supported the closure of Frances Haddon Morgan Center (FHMC) in 2011.  Frances Haddon Morgan Center had a well respected and much used respite program.  Since the closure of FHMC in 2011, it is clear that the need for respite in other RHCs increased.

Please support SB 5243 and help reverse some of the damage done by the bill in 2011 which caused at least one death and led many other people into crisis.   Advocates should be looking at care, protection, choice and progress – not the opposite.  In my experience, The Arc of Washington is not acting as an advocate.

 

Data Retrieved from Developmental Disabilities Administration

Executive Management Information System

June 2010 – June 2014

 

The count for respite clients for each month is the unduplicated count of clients who accessed respite for the month. 

 2015 Developmental Disabilities Bills of Interest – published by The Arc of Washington State

Back from Hiatus

Had to take a hiatus  – but we are now back!

Take a look at this new community – this is one innovative residential option that looks very appealing –

http://www.vinecommunities.com/

I’m looking forward to learning more about this community which is right in my backyard!