We need to provide choices – not restrictions

Please view the video which highlights the need for choices and options in our efforts to provide services and appropriate care and homes for those who live with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  This is one example of many that need to be options allowed and promoted.

 

 

DDD Costs of Care and Decisions which cost lives

Some decisions have been made which have cost people their lives – I’m hoping that before anymore lives are lost or hurt, our legislators will be given accurate data upon which to base their decisions.

This has not happened in the past due to ideology gone awry.  The cost reports for the care for our citizens with developmental disabilities has been falsified and reported inaccurately.  As a start to this, I have prepared the attached letter – it has a few charts and examples of where this reporting has really missed capturing the costs of care for some of our citizens with the highest acuities who chose to live in small community homes.  Remember, this is not the choice for everyone.

The RHC is the most COST EFFECTIVE environment of care for our citizens with the highest acuity.  Why, in times of budget crisis would people allow these misleading cost reports to guide them is beyond me – not only are we ending up spending more for less care but fewer and fewer people will be able to receive care too.

Please read the letter –  Comprehensive Cost comparison

Imprisonment for people, death to some – It’s coming down to that –

Our state is in a crisis – that’s not news to anyone.  Some of the crisis is self-made from some “advocates” who have pushed inaccurate information to our legislators.  The false information and reports based on inaccurate data were utilized in decision making – decisions that are now coming back to bite us.

There are some solutions but people will have to acknowlegde some mistakes that were made.  Here is just one solution – retention of Direct Support Staff –

We need to think of Quality of Life for our citizens with developmental disabilties.  Having staff turnover rates up up to 44% is not only disturbing but dangerous and expensive.  Do you know that if we changed and tweeked the system just a little, we could save over $28,000,000 and improve the quality of life not only for residents but also for caregivers?

Do you know that moving some residents to small community homes will be imprisonment for them?  Without staff to care for them or staff to take them to appointments and community outings, they will be imprisoned in their homes – is this the type of life that you would wish on anyone?

One can clearly see there is a huge problem: Not even taking into account the effect on residents and the loss of knowledge and skills in relating to residents when staff leave, the lack of continuity in care (all which add to stress and increased behavior issues in residents), all the other issues with staff turnover that are seen in the business world are seen here too.

On average it is concluded that it costs about the annual salary of the person to replace that person – so given that, how much money could be saved in retention of staff (increased wages would help and would clearly offset the cost of staff turnover) which would then improve the quality of life.

Group Home Direct Care Staff make roughly $10.00/hour (some more, some less range is $8.55 – 13.62 in 2010) so that calculates out to about $20,000 for each person – so for 2010 in group homes that comes to $2,100,000 dollars on just staff turnover!!!!

Supported Living is $28,900,000

Now those are some ridiculous numbers – One of the keys to this problem is to look at staffing and how to retain the staff – This is what will not only save money but  improve the quality of life for EVERYONE!!!

Now is the time to think about new systems  – think outside the box (sorry for the cliche)

 The data for this chart was obtained from the DDD Residential Programs Staffing Wage & Turnover Study, years 2008, 2009 and 2010

Type of Program 2008 2009 2010
Group Home 48.1 44.3 39.2
Supported Living 44.7 37.8 35.8
SOLA 18.9 14.9 14.4

Hidden Costs, Access to Health Care, What are we to do?

I have attached two essays which help explain part of the problem of access to healthcare and hidden costs when people and agencies which masquerade as Disability Advocates push for the closure of the Intermediate Care Facility for People with Developmental Disabilities (ICF/DD).  These so-called advocates’ agenda is based on old school ideas and false information for today’s population.  The proposals they have will end up costing more, reducing services all around and hurting everyone.

 

Now is the time for some new thoughts and actions – please read the attached and post comments.

 

Thank you – Cheryl

Medical Home Essay

Hidden Costs of care

 

DD Advocates need to come clean with accurate information!

It is critical to drop the adherence to the ideology that “community” living is best and less costly than living in an ICF/DD for many of our high needs citizens with developmental disabilities.  This dogmatic approach is hurting everyone of us – disabled or not.  A continuum of care model takes variety into consideration in addition to cost effectiveness, safety and quality.  A continuum of care model is what needs to be looked at – a model which benefits everyone – disabled or not.

Please see this link for information Come Clean.  This roughly outlines some of these issues.  Resources and accurate data taken from DDD and DSHS management sources.

 

Developmental Disabilities Coalition for Washington State

Dear Advocate for our citizens with Developmental Disabilities,

We are gathering people and organizations to become members of our Developmental Disabilities Coalition for Washington State. We realized that the support is very fractured across the state and with this new coalition we will be able to communicate, educate and interact with others who maintain that a continuum of care for our citizens is critical.

DD Advocates support person-centered care which focuses on quality of life issues, health, safety and community for our loved ones.  We uphold the U.S. Supreme Court Decision Olmstead which guarantees choice to the individual.

This letter is going to all groups within our state who advocate for our citizens with developmental disabilities.  Please pass it on to new groups or interested people.  Also, please read the enclosed  Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities Letter regarding their position on H.R. 2032, a bill which does not uphold the U.S. Supreme Court Decision Olmstead.

There is much work to be done particularly with the onset of more budget cuts.  This is not the time to continue a fractured advocacy movement. 

Please commit to the support of a continuum of care model and join our online group at

 dd-coalition@googlegroups.com

 

DDD “No-Paid” Caseload, part 2

Many in our community are confused by terms that are used and what they actually mean.  According to DDD Administration, this is what I have learned regarding the DDD “No Paid Caseload.”  We need to keep the reality of what this term means in the forefront when looking at DDD and DSHS budgets and services which we provide to our community members.

To be eligible for DDD, one must meet the eligilitiy under  RCW 71A.10.020  Our state’s DDD agency reports the “Total DDD Caseload” in reference to the number of persons who have a current determination for DDD eligibility.

DDD eligibility does not mean that there are paid services.   DDD paid services are dependent on availibility of funding and/or eligibility for the specific services.  The Medicaid State Plan services and services to people enrolled in a Home and Community Based Waiver are not limited by availibility of funding but must meet the eligibility requirements for those programs for services.  Not all people with DDD eligibility meet those requirements.

For all other services, an individual must meet eligibility requirements as well as the division having funding available for the desired service.  DDD utilizes the CARE Assessment to determine whether the person meets eligibility requirements for a specific service.

Those who are currently receiving a funded service through DDD are referred to as the “Paid Services Caseload.”  Those who do not receive a funded service through our division, either due to lack of funding, not meeting eligibility requirements for a specific service, or not desiring paid services at the present time are referred to as the “No Paid Services Caseload.”  The Paid Services Caseload plus the No Paid Services Caseload comprise the Total DDD Caseload.

Also, the “No Paid Services Caseload” clients means that they are not receiving a paid service through DDD.  Many of the DDD clients do receive services from other programs within DSHS.  DDD does not keep track of nor have awareness of other services within DSHS that the DDD clients may be receiving.

Services Received by DD Clients in FY 2008

programs which DDD clients access