Olmstead Violation in Washington State

Washington State passed a law in 2011 which prohibits youth 21 and under from accessing needed supports in the ICF/ID.  This law is in direct conflict with Olmstead.  When I brought up the issues of choice with our then Department of Social and Health Services Secretary Susan Dreyfus, she responded “parents still have choice, they can send their child to another state if they want these services.”  Choice obviously means something different to her than it does to me and the many, many families who I come into contact with.

Two prolific researchers and authors on the issue of deinstitutionalization have written  “Almost all the studies cited earlier involved people with lower support needs, but individuals with severe disability likely do poorly given little support.  Where independent living had the best outcomes for those with mild/moderate ID, those with severe/profound disability achieved the poorest outcomes when living independently, and did better in supported living arrangements with more support.  {Gardner and Curran, 2005}.  Jones et al. {2001} found that the increase staff support for participation resulted in greater resident participation in activities.  However, the benefits were greater for individual with more severe disability.  So, while regularly undertaking activities independent of staff support is associated with skill development and achievement of personal outcomes for people with lower support needs, it is not for persons with severe disability, who instead require active support from caregivers for successful participation in meaningful activities.”

This is the problem that we will see more and more of as those who are still in the ICF/ID tend to be those with the highest support needs.  Our community service system is already struggling and breaking with the people they currently are attempting to serve.  It is documented not only here but throughout the ID research that the studies have predominantly been done looking only at those with lower support needs.  The outcome results from these studies cannot be applied to experiments that will be done with the population which has higher support needs.  This train wreck needs to stop before more of our loved ones are injured or killed.

Why, when a youth, age 19, is doing so well in the supportive community is our state denying him services and trying to boot him out to a community which cannot support him and keep him safe?  Makes NO sense at all.

OLMSTEAD V. L. C. (98-536) 527 U.S. 581 (1999), No. 98-536 (Supreme Court of The United States June 22, 1999).

Lakin, K. C., & Stancliffe, R. J. (2007). Residential Supports for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 151-159.