DD Task Force – Updates and Concerns

The Developmental Disabilities Task Force met and had a very informative meeting.  It appears there is a consensus supporting a continuum of care and a consensus that we are all concerned with those who do not have access to any paid services.  I want to thank the participants for their willingness to look thoroughly at these issues and issues and willingness to think of innovative approaches to the problem.

Link to audio of meeting  The slides and written information may not be up on the DD Task Force Website for a week or so.

Below is my letter to the task force regarding the presentations and comments:

September 7, 2012

Dear Task Force Members,

Thank you for the very informative discussion from the September 6, 2012 meeting. I have listened to it and look forward to seeing the slides that were presented once they are posted on the website. I do have some comments to make regarding the presentation and public testimonies which were heard.

 

Regarding 1:1 care

 

There is a huge difference between 24 hour 1:1 care in the RHC and in the community. Mark Eliason used this number in comparing acuities but what needs to be considered is that there are many in the RHC who do not need 1:1 due to the fact of living in an RHC. They do not need 1:1 in the RHC because there is available staff to keep them within eye sight or to respond to needs.

 
This would not be the case if this very same client with the very same support needs lived in a community setting. My son is one of these very people. While he was living at home we had to have a lock on his bedroom door to keep him safe. We were reported to and investigated by CPS for this. The response from DDD was that we would need to install an alarm system on his bedroom door. All an alarm would do would keep waking us up every time he left the room to wander the house or neighborhood or destroy things. An alarm would only add more crises to a situation which was well controlled by the lock we used.

 
I know that many, many families use methods such as this to keep their children safe but are afraid to say anything for fear of CPS taking their child away. I can tell you that my husband and I had many conversations regarding telling people what we had to do in our home to keep our son safe. My belief is that people need to know and I never had a problem telling people because I knew that the way in which we used the lock was for safety only. Our son never even used his room or went in there except to sleep – he much preferred to interact with people. This was never punitive or restrictive for him but a safety feature which allowed our family to sleep and allowed him to stay in a safe place for the night and sleep when he would sleep.

 
The CPS charges were “unfounded” and the issue they were most concerned about was if Thomas could get out of the house if there was a fire. I explained that if there was a fire and every door of the house was open, Thomas would still need help getting out of the house. In fact, this lock ensured that we would know where he was and could actually save time by going were we knew he would be and getting him to safety.

 
I think a much better way to look at comparing costs, and this was also suggested to me by Don Clintsman in correspondence which we had, is to look at the direct/indirect care costs. These figures are available and I have already sent in data which reflects these costs. Please ask Don Clintsman or Mark Eliason to gather the data on the most costly community clients and you will see the high cost of these clients in the community. When they retrieve this data though, it is important to remember that this is only the DDD cost and not a comprehensive cost which you will see with regards to the daily cost of a resident in the RHC.

 

 

Denial of Admission to RHC by the Admissions Review Team

 

Don Clintsman presented information on this and I believe he stated that there were only 2 people who were denied and these may have been cases in which other residents would have been at risk.
As a parent of a child who was denied services and as an advocate for others, I must agree with Julianne Moore’s testimony. I, too, have witnessed and know of many instances in which the families were denied services by the case manager or regional director. In these instances the process never even got to the Admission Review Team because a Request for Admission was never done. The denial for admission was done long before a request would have reached the team and the team does not even know about these many, many families.

 

I can also say that in our son’s case and with a family who I am working with at this time, both of our sons were already in the RHC prior to the Request for Admission was ever sent to the Admissions Review Team.
Julianne is very correct in her testimony and one cannot look at the Admissions Review Team data for accurate information regarding how many people are denied these services and how many families’ choices and requests for services were not considered.

 

Crisis Care

 

While the concept of the crisis team is good, why not use the facilities and services we already have in place to run this program out of? We have the space and expertise to do this already and it seems ridiculous to start a whole new program for something that we have which already works very well.

 
I believe this was also part of Julianne’s testimony and she is 100% correct in her assessments of the situation.

 
As a parent who has survived crisis after crisis, I can also tell you that you should look to the hospital emergency room data on how many people are taken there for crisis. I believe you will find a lot more information regarding where folks with developmental disabilities go when they have a crisis. I also know this is the case from working with other families and hearing their stories. Talk to the ER nurses at Seattle Children’s and ask them how many families bring their kids with DD (particularly autism) there for crisis intervention. Talk to the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit doctors, nurses, and staff and Seattle Children’s. I believe you will find staggering numbers. You will see a much different picture than one you may hear from DDD. DDD is not aware of many of these crisis admissions to the hospitals because they are not notified.

 
What about connecting the crisis care team with the local hospitals and emergency medical response systems? What about connecting with the Crisis Line? I know that not only in our family’s case but in many, many others, these are the systems which we accessed in times of crisis. These are the places in which we will be able to realize the extent of the crisis situation with people with DD.

 

 

Statewide Crisis Care Team

 

Again, while this seems like a great concept, as a parent I do not understand how this would work. When a team is sent to a home, where will the team stay while the child is being stabilized? Are hotel costs and travel costs all added in with the operational costs of this program?

 
Why, when we already have two facilities in Eastern Washington which have experts at working with DD clients in crisis, would a family opt to send their child across the mountains to Lakewood for care? This is not only an issue for those on the east side of the mountains but also on the west side. Doesn’t this only add to the crisis? Where is the family going to stay to be close to their child? Families are already at financial breaking points and the cost of travel and lodging could just add to the crisis – not to mention loss of employment and other issues that may come into this scenario such as child care for other children.

 
Crisis care needs to be in one’s community – we need to utilize the services we have and enhance them rather than reinventing the wheel with a program which is untested and unknown.

 

Choice of care and community

 

I hear over and over again that people have more choice in community settings – what they want to eat, who their roommates are, where they want to go and where they want to work as if those in the RHC do not have these choices.

 
Those in residential settings run by vendors and the state do not have choices of roommates. When looking at community residential homes, families are only given choices of homes in which there are vacancies. I have heard (please correct me if I’m wrong about this) but that the department cannot certify more homes or beds in the community until the vacancies in the current homes are filled.

 
If this is true and the current vacancies do not meet the needs of people needing residential services, how will their needs be met?

 

 
Emily Roberts testimony was wonderful and she gives a very different picture of people with developmental disabilities than the people who currently reside in the RHCs. Emily is very articulate and capable. She and others in SAIL are people who can be self advocates and I applaud them for that. They, though, do not speak for people like my son and many others who cannot make their voices heard. Emily talks about people who are able to work and go out in the community independently and she and others are great examples of why we need a continuum of care service model.

 

Waiver and allowable services

 

Don Clintsman reviewed the waiver services and referred to allowable services under each waiver. It also needs to be noted that there is a huge difference between “allowable” and “approved.” What is missing is that for the “allowable” services to be provided, they must be “approved” by a team. They also must be delivered by a contracted provider. These two conditions make these “allowable” services unattainable for many who may need them.
Trying to have the “allowable” services provided for our son was one of the issues which added to the crisis. Even with prescriptions from medical doctors and physical therapists, DDD would deny these services and say they were not necessary. With one thing in particular, the DDD Children’s manager told us to restrict fluids for our son so he would not need a specialty diaper – fluid restriction was not the problem – his neurology was the problem and he needed these specialty diapers. So, even though they were an “allowed” service, they were not “approved” and we therefore needed to purchase them ourselves. This is just one example but I have many which I could give.

 

Those without Services

 

I think it was made perfectly clear that we are all concerned about those not on a paid service. It is also clear there is a consensus that we do need a continuum of care to best meet the needs of ALL people with developmental disabilities. We also need to support the families in caring for their loved ones. They are the backbone of support and when we run them into the ground we not only send the person with DD into crisis but destroy the family.
I, too, am the face of crisis and survival, as Diane Larsen testified to you. It’s amazing what families will endure to take care of their loved one at home. The self-sacrifice is incredible and we need to support these families to enable them to care for their loved ones.
Moving our son to the RHC was not our first choice but it was the choice we had to make to keep him safe and healthy. It was the choice we had to make to save my life. It was the choice we had to make to enable our other children to heal. It was the choice we had to make to have our family together. It was the choice we had to make which would provide our son with the supports he needs to be a productive and contributing member of our community.
I miss our son. I still cry over this choice knowing that I, as his mother, am not able to care for him as I had planned. But that’s about me.

 

When I see him excited to return home to Fircrest after a “home visit”, when I see him jumping up and down with joy at Fircrest because he’s home and has to run around telling all the staff that is there “hi” without caring about telling me “bye”, when I hear a housemate of his say “Tommy’s home. Tommy is a happy boy”, when he can go into the kitchen and get a drink independently, when he can ask for a snack and his staff tells me it’s his new favorite thing, when staff tell me things that Thomas loves to do or what he has accomplished, when I walk around campus and he says “hi” to everyone he sees and calls them all by name and they return with “Hi Thomas”, I have to remember, this is about him. He is safe, healthy, and happy in his community.

Thank you,

Cheryl Felak, RN, BSN
Seattle, WA

Please Ask DSHS and DDD These Questions!

This letter was sent to all Washington State Legislators and many other advocates.  I do hope that these questions are asked and that answers are received.

 

december 1 letter to legislator and others

 

The Department of Social and Health Services and the Division of Developmental Disabilities NEED to answer these questions and more.  The data that they continually present to our legislators is flawed and incomplete and doesn’t tell the whole story as it needs to be told in order to make policy decisions.

 

This is who we need to ask questions of:

DSHS – Aging and Disability Services Administration Tree

Susan N. Dreyfus, Secretary

Department of Social &  Health Services

Susan.Dreyfus@dshs.wa.gov

 

Don Clintsman

Division of Developmental  Disabilities

Aging & Disability  Services Admin

donald.clintsman@dshs.wa.gov

 

 

Janet Adams

Office of Quality Assurance and Self Directed Services

adamsje@dshs.wa.gov

 

 

Formation of Washington State Task Force to Look at DDD Services

Attached below is my letter to Don Clintsman, Assistant Director, Division of Developmental Disabilities.  He had responded to a letter which I had written to MaryAnne Lindeblad, Assistant Secretary, Aging and Disabilities Service Administration, inquiring about the formation of the Task Force and the importance for a balanced perspective of the participants.

Dear Mr. Clintsman,

 

Thank you for responding to my letter to Ms. Lindebland.  It is hopeful to hear that the The Department of Social and Health Services and the Department of Developmental Disabilities finally understand the concept of and have adopted the term “continuum of care.”

 

We, as grassroots disability advocates have always stressed the importance of the continuum of care, realizing that each person needs to be looked at individually and their needs met according to their assessed support needs.  The only way to accomplish this goal and also accomplish it within a reasonable budget is to continue to offer the full continuum of care to all – regardless of their age group.

 

Once one realizes the critical importance of this continuum, I’m hoping that the budget figures and reports will more accurately be reported to reflect the true cost of care – especially for our most vulnerable citizens and those with high acuity levels in several areas. 

 

It has never been disputed that citizens with high acuity can be accommodated in neighborhood communities and it’s wonderful that this arrangement can work for many.  It is neither realistic nor safe to consider this the best option or even a viable option for many of our citizens who currently reside in the state operated residential communities or those who have requested admittance but have been denied access to these communities. 

 

Given the many constraints of resources – not only dollars – but people and housing, it only makes economic sense to utilize the concept of “scale of economies.”  This concept utilizes the fact that being able to serve more people with the same type of support needs and sharing some of those services within a community actually saves dollars.  Within these communities, the residents also receive their comprehensive health care – minimizing many transportation costs, emergency back up costs, and extra personnel costs used to transport residents to other appointments just to highlight a few examples of costs which are often forgotten.   The residents have much better preventative care and follow-up care, are not traumatized by being “taxied” around town for various appointments such as lab draws, xrays, dental exams, eyeglass fittings, etc. 

 

I will highlight one example of a woman in her mid 30’s.  She lives in a supported living arrangement, has cancer and many other health related problems.  She came through the department in which I work to have her port-a-cath changed due to mismanagement and infection.  This is very unusual to need a port-a-cath replaced, particularly if the first one has only been in a short while.   This woman presented in surgery, unaccompanied by a guardian, unable to comprehend all that was going on.  She had missed many of her scheduled doctor’s appointments related to not only her cancer treatment but preventative and follow-up care for other health issues.  It is stories such as this that I see as totally preventable when a person lives in a residential community with comprehensive care.  What budget does the cost of her care due to mismanagement of her health problems get attributed to?  This doesn’t even take into the account the effects of pain and suffering to this woman. 

 

I know from  looking at many sources which DDD and DSHS provide regarding costs of care, services requested and provided and even the cost of care for the 30 highest cost DDD residents  that you provided to me, the figures that have been used for cost comparison are extremely inaccurate with missing costs, cost shifting and data input errors.    Data that was used for these cost comparison reports was taken from reports with many inaccuracies – therefore, the data pulled is essentially useless if getting an accurate assessment of the cost was the goal.   

 

 

In addition to the issues of safety for our residents, we must also look at safety and training for the caregivers.  I will be looking into the L&I cost of “on the job injuries” to caregivers and charting from which type of facility the highest percentages originate from. 

 

Again, hearing that The Department has now adopted and supports a continuum of care, maybe we can really move forward with innovative systems which are cost effective to safely support our most vulnerable citizens. 

 

I will be following up this letter with data which supports the need for a continuum of care.  In addition to having accurate data, it is critical for some very prominent advocacy groups to realize that denying our citizens with the support needs which are available in the residential communities is not only denying these people their human and civil rights but will weaken the whole system by putting an undue financial burden on our state.  These actions which they advocate for will actually minimize the services to many who have less acute support needs.  The dollar can only be stretched so far without something giving.

 

 If one were to follow their example of “everyone needs to live in the community” I’m afraid that we will lose many of our beloved family members. 

 

Again, thank you for your follow-up letter and I will be communicating with the Task Force Members often once the committee has been decided.