HCA Training in Washington

75 hour training  There are at least 40 places other than SEIU 775 to obtain DSHS approved 75 hour training to become an HCA in Washington State.  Below is a link to the page on the DSHS website.  There are various options from online modules to all in-class trainings.  You can choose which training program works for you.  Some are offered only in one county, others are throughout the state.

Training Sites  

The site is difficult to find on the DSHS website – one has to go through many pages and clicks to find it.  If you need help, contact me and I will help you.

Below is one example of one of these DSHS approved Training sites.  There are roughly 40 such agencies listed and these alternatives may help to ease our crisis.

Cornerstone Healthcare Training Company

Another issue with HCA is the situation that was written about in Crosscut October 25, 2018.   This article focuses on a different problem but also related to the fact that Washington State has some of the most restrictive requirements to becoming a Home Care Aide.

Would-be home health workers claim bias in state’s qualifying exam

“Washington state is also home to some of the toughest requirements for home care aides, thanks to a 2011 ballot initiative sponsored by the SEIU 775 Northwest. Within 200 days of being hired — or 260 days for those with limited English proficiency — home care aides must pass a background check and the certification exam.”

We need caregivers – we need to find a way to promote the training and passing of the requirements.  What we have is not working.

SEIU 775 spending to Restrict Caregiving

2008  Initiative 1029 –  Washington Long Term Care Initiative

total funds raised 1029

 

funds raised for 1029funds raised against 1029

 

2011 Initiative 1163 – Washington Long Term Care Initiative

total spent on 1163top contributor for 1163top contributor provided against 1163

 

2016 – Initiative 1501 – Washington Increased Penalties for Crimes Against Vulnerable Individuals

total funds spent initiative 1501

All in all, SEIU 775 funded the great majority for each of these three initiatives.  With misleading information in the titles and tag lines, it’s easy to see how voters were fooled.

The real people getting hurt are those who need care and those who want to provide the care.  There are TOO many barriers for the people involved in accessing the supports they need to remain in their communities.

 

total funds for all 3 initiativestotal funds spent against all 3 initiativesfunds spent for the 3 initiatives

 

Do You Need A Caregiver?

I and many others are well aware of the crisis that we have regarding lack of trained, qualified and committed caregivers for our community members in need.

Being aware of this crisis, I would think that the Department of Social and Health Services would want to work with their clients and independent providers to provide flexibility and alternatives so that the providers are able to complete the training.

In Washington State, independent providers can be hired by the disabled person and after having completed the 5-hour “Orientation and Safety” class, background check and fingerprints, may begin working.  They have 120 days to complete the remaining 70 hours of the Basic Training and need to have their Home Care Aide Credential within 200 days of starting to provide care.

While this may not sound difficult, in reality, many people are finding it impossible to complete for several reasons.

  1.  While working and providing care for the disabled person, the IP is also expected to travel to the SEIU training sites to attend the required evening classes.  For a person who provides care in the evening, this task is virtually impossible once caregiving duties have started.
  2. There is no “exception to rule” or extension available if unusual circumstances come up – such as family crisis, relocation, availability,  change in status.  DSHS has no flexibility for accommodations for IPs to get their training. 
  3. Even though there are alternative courses available through other DSHS approved training sites, IPs are not informed of these choices – even if they have difficulties with attending or completing the Training Partnership classes.

 

In order to be independent and involved in her community, Sarah needs to have reliable caregivers.  Sarah is able to self-direct but does need the caregiver to provide physical and personal care. Sarah had a terrific and experienced caregiver.  The restrictions of completing the 75 hour SEIU 775 training within 120 days of starting work has proven to be too restrictive for many people who have applied.

register through SEIU 775 site

This is the checklist from DSHS on steps to becoming an HCA – note that the ONLY training course information provided is the SEIU 775 training and a link to the SEIU 775 website.

The caregiver, having graduated from PIMA Medical Institute and having worked in an Internal Medicine Clinic as a Medical Assistant for 4 years in addition to having the experience of caring for her profoundly disabled younger brother, it seemed that she would fit into one of the categories that do not need to complete the full 75 hours SEIU 775 training by the criteria of “similar training”.

Unfortunately, a medical Assistant is not one of the jobs with “similar training” that is exempt from the 75 hours.  The caregiver decided that taking a Nursing Assistant  Course and becoming a Nursing Assistant – Certified (NAC). would be the best option for her.

This is where the whole issue gets more and more confusing and ridiculous when one just wants to do their job and provide appropriate and safe care to her employee.

DSHS sent a letter informing her that she would not be paid after 120 days due to not completing the SEIU 775 Training within that time frame.  DSHS sent the letter to an old address (even though they had been using her current address for not only her W-2 but other correspondence between the case manager and SEIU 775).  Due to this error on the part of DSHS, the caregiver did not receive the notice until the time limit to send an appeal had expired.  The caregiver had already taken steps before the deadline to become an NAC.

  1. January 18, 2018 – Application sent to Department of Health for Nursing Assistant Certification
  2. February 26, 2018 – appeal letter sent in to DSHS from caregiver regarding notice that she would no longer be paid since she had not completed the SEIU 775 training.
  3. March 13, 2018 – caregiver had discussion with the credentialing specialist at DOH who provided extremely useful information with some options available to gain certification.   She provided information  on the pending NAC if that was still a consideration.  (See note below) The information on the website was not totally correct with the processes and testing needed to complete the bridge program from MA to NAC and this lack of information was a barrier to completing this training.

Your Pending Nursing Assistant Certified (NAC) will stay pending for 300 days. At that time, you will be sent a 30 day warning letter. That gives you 30 days to respond letting us know if you would like to keep your NAC open. All you need to do is simply respond to that letter via email or by phone and we will extend it another 300 days. There is no limit to how many times you can extend it out as far as I know. This will keep your already submitted $65 payment and NAC application applicable to completing the NAC application process at a later date if you would like.

There is also a 24 hour bridge training program you can take after you have an Active Home Care Aide license as well. If you would like to pursue your Home Care Aide license for now and complete the NAC application process at a later date via bridge training, you would need to submit the following: (You’ve already submitted the application and $65 payment)

4.  April 9, 2018 – DSHS filed a Motion to Dismiss  claiming the caregiver had no right to appeal. A hearing was heard with the judge and the Department Administrative Hearing Coordinator – Mr. Korff.

5.  April 19, 2018 A pre-hearing appointment with the Judge and Department Administrative Hearing Coordinatore was set for

  • “Mr. Korff stated at the motion hearing April 9, 2018 that the Department first learned of my change of address on March 1, 2018 when they received my request for an appeal. I believe that the evidence I have provided indicates that the Department had my current and correct address on record as I was receiving mail and payments from November 2017.  I did my part and updated my address with the case manager and evidently there was a break in the system after that”

  • “I was working for free from January 26, 2018 and am currently still working for free for Sarah due to the fact that there are so few providers that are able to work and I do not want to leave Sarah without the needed care. My plan was to complete the certification for a CNA as soon as I could and then submit the license to DSHS and resume being paid for the care I provided.”

  • “I had sent in my appeal to the Office of Administrative Hearings with the hope of being able to extend my temporary status and complete the HCA training. My concerns I raised are appropriate and I believed that common sense and possibly an exemption to the rule could be used to enable me to continue the HCA training (at my own expense) and also be paid to provide care to Sarah”

  • “It has been clear by my actions that I have been attempting to accomplish training and complete the required steps in order to have a HCA credential and be paid for care-giving. It has been through a series of unfortunately timed events that I was unable to complete the steps in the required time set by the Department.”

  • “Things are again stalled due to the Department refusing to allow me to have an appeal and instead changing the hearing to a “prehearing conference”. There is still no decision on the part of the Department.”

  • Below are the actions that I am requesting:

    • I receive payment for the two weeks I worked in January, 2018 that I was unable to document due to being locked out of the IPOne system. (Allow me access to the system so that I can update it and submit my hours)

    • I would like an exemption to the rule of 30 days to appeal and to extend the temporary contract.  I would like an extension of 60 days which will give me time to complete all the required training for the HCA.

    • I would appreciate being paid for the time going forward while I complete my training (at my own expense) and continue to provide the caregiving that Sarah requires. I plan to have my HCA training completed within 60 days from now.  I would greatly welcome the opportunity to continue working for Sarah during this time but I also need to be paid for my work.

6. April 26, 2018 – Mr Korff objected to each of the 9 documents that appellant submitted regarding the Motion to Dismiss  on the grounds of relevance – stating all were irrelevant.

7. May 7, 2018 – Order Denying  Department  Motion to Dismiss issued –  Judge found the appellant’s request for an appeal hearing was timely.

8.  May 8, 2018, Caregiver submitted HCA Application to DOH  choosing to complete the HCA training at a DSHS approved training site rather than the NAC since it would be quicker at this point to complete and get the certification.

9. June 13, 2018 – Administrative Court Hearing with Judge and Department Administrative Hearing Coordinator, Mr. Korff.   Mr. Korff again stated that there were no other options to take the HCA training and that SEIU 775 was the only course available.

10. June 28, 2018 – Caregiver submitted documents to the Judge regarding appeal and request for extension as an exception to the rule together with  information from DSHS regarding alternative training available which the Department Administrative Hearing Coordinator denied existed.

 

To be continued –

 

Care-Giver Crisis – Here’s why

Disclaimer – I am not anti-union by making these comments but have concerns with how the union controls the Home Care Aides in Washington State.

As one who has had to rely on the independent direct care service providers (home care providers), I have been aware of the total lack of a qualified pool of employees and the restrictions in place that are prohibitive to alleviating the crisis.

Ten years ago in 2008,  Washington State passed Initiative 1029 which was sponsored by SEIU 775.  I was against this initiative for many reasons, many of which remain true today.  This legislation did not increase the pool of qualified caregivers but has made things much more difficult.  Many issues sounded good – such as more training for caregivers but there were too many strings attached which have actually made finding and keeping a care provider more difficult for families.

The requirements to become a Home Care Aid (ACA) are found here

The HCA checklist provided by DSHS is here

There are MANY problems with this process that make it impossible for people to get their HCA credential.

  1.  DSHS only informs applicants of the SEIU 775 training classes and actually tells people this is the ONLY training that is approved –
  2. The SEIU 775 training is very difficult to take while one is also working and may have childcare to consider and transportation issues.
  3. Classes of 3-4 hours a night, 3 nights a week may be impossible for many applicants to complete – this right here is a deal breaker.
  4. The time frame to complete the training and take the test is too restrictive with no alternative options.  If one does not complete the training by 120 days of application and one does not take the test within 200 days of application – there is no appeal, except to rule or extension available.  THAT’S IT – YOU FAILED!!