Kevin is trapped!

Many have been following the issues of those with IDD who have been dropped off and abandoned by their group homes into the hospitals.  This is not a new issue but one that has finally been acknowledged as happening.  We need a solution  – NOW

Recently, Keven, our 26 year old friend has been “on hold” in the Emergency room at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Bellingham, WA.  I sent an online complaint to the Washington DD Ombudsman and maybe the more complaints they receive, the better the chance at a positive solution – not only for Kevin but for others.

Here is the information that I submitted on my complaint – feel free to submit your own complaint regarding the issues that are happening. DD Ombuds complaint submitted May 6 2019

Today, Kevin’s mom informed me of the following information she received:

Kevin’s situation…

This afternoon after visiting Kevin at St. Joseph Hospital, I was told that if he attempts to leave the unit (SECU).

.. they will let him leave the hospital and 911 will be called.

When is this nightmare going end??

 

 

Hospitals are not Community Living

The DD Ombudsman’s Office published the report “Stuck in the Hospital”

This report discusses the crisis situation that we have gotten ourselves into by not listening to the families, caregivers and people involved.   It has been known for some time that people are boarding in the emergency rooms and hospitals because there are no safe community options for them.

With the mindset and policy that refuses to acknowledge that the Intermediate Care Facility has a place in the continuum of care and admission to these potentially life saving communities is prohibited by the administration, we have developed a situation that is much worse.

Has DDA and the legislature willingly been closing their eyes to this situation?  The fact that there has been no tracking of this by DDA or by the hospitals is neglectful when trying to understand the needs of the population.

The trauma and cost that is wasted is horrendous.  Reading these stories makes me very angry and very sad.  I cannot imagine the trauma that these people have endured while “living” in the emergency room or hospital.

As a parent of a disabled child who also experienced some of this (but nowhere near the extent described in the report) I remember times of crisis when there was no place to go.

Extreme mania and psychosis caused medical complications which necessitated a medical hospitalization.   My son was loud, did not sleep, was hallucinating and would not stay in one place.  He paced the hospital halls with family or caregivers (not enough nurses to provide his care).  At one point, we were told that we needed to keep him in his room since he was scaring the other patients.  Clearly, they did not understand that confining him to his room would only agitate him more and cause more noise and activity that would be even more disruptive.

The inpatient psychiatric unit was not much better – while they were able to manage his mania/psychosis, they were not prepared to manage medical issues or understand his intellectual/developmental disability.

The option that was suggested by the discharge team from the psych unit was “call the police” for the next crisis – meaning that my son, at age 14, would be taken to jail.

Jails and hospitals should not even be a consideration for this population in crisis.

The only place that would have been appropriate to provide both the comprehensive care needed to stabilize my son was the ICF/IID – unfortunately, he was denied admission for at least one year after a request was made and consequently had several lengthy hospitalization before this was finally approved.

Thank you to the DD Ombuds for addressing this crisis situation and developing a plan for correction.  Now that it is acknowledged, a solution can be addressed.

 

 

Too Little, Too Late

In continuing to  address the issues of reported healthcare neglect  in the intermediate care facility for those with intellectual disabilities and how investigations are handled within the Department of Social and Health Services, I have had very similar observations of a flawed system that is reported by experts in the report Too Little Too Late:  A Call to End Tolerance of Abuse and Neglect.

too-little-too-late-title

The above report does not address complaints and investigations of allegations from those living in the institutions but the observations reported by the expert consultants are concerns that I have expressed regarding lack of accountability in the system which is supposedly there to protect our most vulnerable.  I realize it is not my imagination but reality that the system is broken.

“My review of the Washington DSHS Quality Assurance system, specifically mortality review, found a flawed system that does not “meet and maintain high quality standards” and is not an effective safeguard to protect health and welfare. Within the 6 months studied-June 1- December 31, 2012- there was a number of preventable waiver participant deaths. In addition to the concerns I have about these avoidable deaths, the poor quality of care for other participants, whose death although expected, causes me great concern about the quality of health care coordination and provider ability to meet the health and welfare needs of Washington waiver participants.”

Sue A. Gant, Ph.D. Date:  August 6, 2012

 

“Another unusual feature of the RCS investigation summaries is that they often did not reference findings pertinent to the allegations of abuse, neglect, mistreatment, and exploitation referenced in the initial complaint(s). In other cases, investigation summaries would reference these allegations and findings regarding their merit, but then conclude that the no provider practice deficiency was identified.”

“Many of the problems could be traced back to the tardiness of the investigations, but others (as also noted in my initial report) reflected the investigators’ failure to address significant issues, including allegations of abuse and neglect. In addition, as noted in my initial report, these investigations continued to manifest a trend of very “conservative” determinations of no citations for “failed provider practice,” even in instances when investigation documents explicitly referenced failed practices.

In addition, DSHS’ routine “planned ignoring” of allegations of employee abuse and neglect in its investigations is wholly non-compliant with basic expectations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, as well as its own Quality Management Strategy”

Nancy K. Ray, Ed.D. President NKR & Associates, Inc

As a nurse who has worked in a Joint Commission Accredited Healthcare Institution  for over 30 years, I understand the purpose of nursing policies and protocols.  They are not just a useless exercise – they are there for a reason – TO ENSURE PATIENT SAFETY – and they accomplish this through various routes.

he prerequisite training credentials of their investigators, are not addressed at all by DSHS’ policies. Other procedures prescribed by the policies are routinely not complied with, either because resources to ensure their implementation are not available or supervisory oversight by DSHS is so lax that noncompliance by investigators and their supervisors has become commonplace.

When an investigation is returned “Allegations unfounded” together with the nursing policy that was clearly violated in many areas, questions of integrity, accountability, knowledge of the subject matter, and many other questions arise.  There is certainly not “closure” to the problem as the agency sweeps it under the carpet with the rest of the ignored problems they wish away.

Resident health and safety is at risk and will continue to be so until some of these problems are addressed and a plan of correction put in place and evaluated for success.

Abuse and Neglect Response Improvement Report – October 2013

subcommittee-response

 

There is a solution to the problems that I am referring to.  Ensure The Department of Health has oversight and licenses the healthcare clinics housed on the campuses of the residential habilitation centers.  DOH is the state agency which specializes in healthcare and should be the agency which provides oversight of healthcare – not the Department of Social and Health Services.