Congregate is not the same as segregate

I am very disappointed with the Joint Position Statement published June 23, 2016 by The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD).

While there is quite a bit of quality information in this statement it is obviously clear that these organizations also have a strong bias against choice of residential settings.  It is unfortunate that these organizations do not understand that congregate care is not the same as segregated care.

“Everyone with an intellectual or developmental disability deserves to live in the community where they have the opportunity to experience vibrant lives that include work, friends, family, and high expectations for community contributions.”  These goals can and are also accomplished in congregate and campus type communities.

Many states have built systems that utilize group homes as a key way to support people in the community. When people find themselves in a situation where they need to live outside of their family home, they are often placed in an “open bed” versus being offered person-centered supports designed specifically to meet their needs. In many of these situations, people remain as isolated in these settings as they do in a large-scale institution. A process for creating and sustaining supports that make their living situation a home in a neighborhood is needed.

It is clear from the above statements that these organizations realize there is a problem with the funding and system that many supports are built around.

Yet AAIDD and AUCD are doing exactly what they chastise others for doing – categorically denying the individual the personal choice for individualized care in the residential setting they choose.  The setting is not what necessarily causes the segregation – separation from familiy, friends and community causes segregation.  Unfortunately that segregation can happen in any residential setting.

It is the segregation that needs to be called out – not the setting.

 

 

We need to provide choices – not restrictions

Please view the video which highlights the need for choices and options in our efforts to provide services and appropriate care and homes for those who live with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  This is one example of many that need to be options allowed and promoted.

 

 

Back from Hiatus

Had to take a hiatus  – but we are now back!

Take a look at this new community – this is one innovative residential option that looks very appealing –

http://www.vinecommunities.com/

I’m looking forward to learning more about this community which is right in my backyard!

Protect Olmstead Report Language

Deinstitutionalization – The Committee notes the nationwide trend toward deinstitutionalization of patients with intellectual or developmental disabilities in favor of community-based settings.  The committee also notes that in Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), a majority of the Supreme Court held that the Americans with Disabilities Act does not condone or require removing individuals from institutional settings when they are unable to handle or benefit from a community-based setting, and that Federal law does not require the imposition of community-based treatment on patients who do not desire it.  The committee strongly urges the Department to factor the needs and desires of patients, their families, and caregivers, and the importance of affording patients the proper setting for their care, into its enforcement of the Americans with Disabilities Act.”

Although this language simply requires the Department of Justice to adhere to Olmstead when enforcing Olmstead, some federally-funded organizations that favor serving everyone in community settings without regard to individual choice and need, have somehow found this report language threatening and are now urging the Senate to reject it when it takes up the Senate Commerce, Justice and Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill as early as this coming Monday.”

Your letters and support are needed NOW to inform your Senators of this issue.  It is very simple – just follow this link:

VOR – Protect Olmstead Report Language

 

Please take action before it is too late!

THANK YOU!

 

Text above taken from the VOR website

Universal Kinetic Park – Phase 1

We are rolling out our Phase 1 for our Universal Kinetic Park at Fircrest.

Phase 1 will be the survey, detailed construction design for the Pedestrian Promenade – the backbone and community connection for the whole campus.   Fircrest is a beautiful campus community which is home to over 200 people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  In addition to our long term residents, we also provide short term and respite care for others from the surrounding community.

Help us with our vision for an active, thriving community hub for our residents, the people who love and care for them and for the local community.  We can only do this with your support!

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Park Design

Help us transform the narrow, cracked, uneven sidewalks left over from the old Seattle Naval Hospital to a wide, smooth and ADA accessible Pedestrian Promenade.  The Pedestrian Promenade will be a winding walkway, inviting people to enjoy walking and the sights and activities along the way.  In addition to the community connections of the Pedestrian Promenade, we will also pave walkways from the main corridor to the entrances of each home.  Currently, this is a muddy path with puddles for the majority of our year in Seattle.

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As you can see Fircrest is a beautiful campus – but it does not have ADA accessible walkways even though it is home to over 200 residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

 The sidewalks pictured below are hazards.  We need to remedy the situation.

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Please contribute to our campaign for Phase 1 –

All donations go directly to the cause – no overhead!  

You know your dollars will go to a great cause. 


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Mobility Park

We are on our way to major improvements for health, safety and community spirit building!

Please join the efforts in transforming the dangerous sidewalks in our community to a safe, welcoming, ADA accessible “pedestrian promenade.”

Our Campus Community is in great need of safe, ADA walkways.The campus is a beautiful setting and home to many of our loved ones with intellectual/developmental disabilities complicated by complex medical and/or behavioral concerns.

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The sidewalks are left over from the 1940’s when this property was used for the Seattle Naval Hospital. The walkways are too narrow for 2 people to walk side by side and are dangerous for those who need assistance with mobility. There are many cracks, holes and uneven areas. Much has been spent on grinding surfaces over the years but this is only a band-aid “fix” to the problem of dangerous, non ADA compliant walkways.

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http://www.gofundme.com/Fircrest-Mobility-Park

Given that this community is a community of people with disabilities, it is time that we supported the construction of ADA accommodations in the walkways on campus.

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http://www.gofundme.com/Fircrest-Mobility-Park

Adding a pedestrian promenade will greatly enhance the life experience of our residents – we see it as a community connector and will be an invitation for them to get outside, walk, enjoy the sites and company of others and build community.

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http://www.gofundme.com/Fircrest-Mobility-Park

Please help us fund the survey and design for this much needed walkway.

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http://www.gofundme.com/Fircrest-Mobility-Park

THANK YOU

 

Design Team:

We are building our design team.  Peggy Gaynor of GAYNOR, Inc. is providing landscape architectural design & consulting services on behalf of the project.  As soon as we have chosen our surveyor and/or civil engineer, we will publish their names as part of the professional design team also.

http://gaynorinc.com/design-philosophy/