Shaun Bickley – “Breaking” Barriers

I was not at this meeting but I do believe there was chaos present given what I have witnessed and experienced at past meetings.
So many questions and concerns about Bickley – reading how he is disturbed by others who may not show behavior of respect and professionalism, I clearly remember the first in -person interaction I had with him.  Bickley, himself needs some lessons in being a professional and a public servant – volunteer or not, disabled or not.
Public Facebook Post this evening –

This is the email I sent Evan Philip in the Mayor’s Office, CM Lisa Herbold and her staffmember Shannon Perez-Darby, and Interim Director of OCR Mariko Lockhart.

I’m at my wit’s end with the city standing behind misogynists and white supremacists but bristling at the slightest criticism of their policies. Despite the work we have been able to accomplish, several of us are ready to quit after today if the city can’t deal with these issues and provide competent staff support.

*****

To all concerned,

I want to continue to express my disbelief at the city’s unwillingness to provide support to the Disability Commission, and its ongoing support of white supremacist, misogynist, and ableist behavior.

I don’t know how many Commissioners have to come forward and complain about misogyny and white supremacy from Mayoral and Council-appointments before the city takes it seriously. Apparently six isn’t enough. Ten? Fifteen?

Today I witnessed ChrisTiana ObeySumner co-chair by themselves while two older white men screamed at them, interrupted, and corrected them. At one point Eric Scheir began screaming at the top of his lungs at ChrisTiana, threatening to sue. People left the room,. Mr. Scheir is perfectly aware of his ability to physically intimidate women and non-binary people by screaming at the top of his lungs, and if he isn’t, he is unqualified to serve on the Commission. I can tell you he would be fired from any job I have ever had for that kind of behavior.

Jayson Morris is a Council-appointed Commissioner. Six Commissioners have complained about his behavior, the Co-Chair and the Director of OCR had a meeting with him to address his behavior, and the Co-Chairs wrote Councilmember Herbold about him on June 8. Nothing has happened. Eric Scheir is a Mayoral appointment who has exhibited this kind of narcissistic, racist, and misogynistic behavior since before he was appointed. Nothing has happened.

At what point do I assume that individuals acting as agents of white supremacy and misogyny, on behalf of the Mayor and City Council, are simply carrying out the will of those entities? Especially since Meg Bartosovsky and I were removed without even being spoken to because of our advocacy on the Commission. There is a pattern here, and it’s that white supremacists and eugenicists are given every chance and every opportunity to thrive, but developmentally disabled advocates who question the city are removed post haste.

Six Commissioners signed a letter asking for Marta Idowu to be replaced in her position as Commission liaison. Today, while this screaming rant happened, Marta did nothing. What “support” is OCR providing if they don’t address violence within the meetings, don’t keep order, don’t address micro and macroaggressions, and can’t even keep accurate minutes?

My peers voted to appoint me into a Commission-based seat and for me to continue on as co-Chair. I would love to continue the great work we have done, work the City has praised and been credited for, but I sat in that meeting feeling physically unsafe as a man screamed his lungs out at us with the full backing of the Mayor and City Council, and I’ve seen the disparate treatment we receive when we bring light to these issues.

I don’t know how many time I can ask that someone–the Mayor’s Office, OCR, the City Council–take responsibility for the situation it has created: to deal with violent Commissioners and to provide competent staff support to our meetings.

Thanks for listening,
Shaun Bickley
Co-Chair, Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities

Shaun Bickley For the record, it’s been 3 weeks and I still haven’t been given a reason why I wasn’t reappointed (and Meg Bartosovsky STILL hasn’t been told even as little as I have–they removed her without a word). I don’t expect this administration to reappoint me at this point, but I do expect them to be professional about it and to stop supporting racist, misogynistic, and ableist behavior.

 

Transcript of conversation between Cheryl Felak, disabled community advocate and Shaun Bickley, Co-Chair of Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities

May 17, 2018

This “discussion” took place at Seattle City Hall at a public meeting

Cheryl Felak statements     Shaun Bickley statements

I’m banned because you don’t agree with my opinion, my questions have not been answered I’ve just been told I’m a liar, 

  • You’re abusive

Huh

  • You’re abusive – you’re banned because you’re abusive

I’m abusive?  So what has been abusive about what I’ve said?

  • Calling people low functioning

I did not do that

  • Harassing people okay – I don’t really– I don’t really like – what is your point? Why are you here?

My point is that I would like to have some information shared with some facts

  • And I have told you repeatedly and you’ve said it’s a lie – you’ve been answered – you did a public disclosure request you already have the information that you asked for – did you pay for it- did you pick it up

Yes I have and I’d like to

  • Ok great –

 Tell you there’s information

  • Can you please not get in my face because you’re way too close to my personal space

Okay I’ll stand back

  • Thank you

I’d like to tell you that there was information and facts that were not shared with the commission and with others about jobs and yes, I understand supported employment – do you understand about transportation, what it costs, training, job development, job skill development was any of that

  • Yes – what’s your point

My point is – was that addressed by this commission

  • (Exasperated exhale and long pause) – uh we have two legal certificates – you understand the Northwest Center wasn’t – right

I understand that – I’m not talking about the Northwest Center – I’m talking about the special certificates

  • Right

Were the issues of job skill development, job coaches?

  • Yes

That was all discussed in this commission in relation to elimination

  • So let me

Let me finish my sentence – in relation to elimination of those certificates – was that discussed and how that was going to be taken into consideration

  • It’s not a factor because they consented and they agreed to keep those people at their level. We had two people – this isn’t like Texas where there were 121 certificates – we had 2

You haven’t answered my question yet

  • YES WE DISCUSSED IT AND WE DISCUSSED THAT THERE WEREN’T ANY BARRIERS WE WERE READY TO GO and so listen I really need you to understand, now listen I need you to understand, now listen

Now you back up

  • No

You’re in my space

  • I’m not in your space

City of Seattle Liaison “Shaun back up”

Back up

  • Ok we’re done – Good-bye

Ok – thank you

  • You’re abusive – I don’t need to speak to you, I’m a volunteer,

I’m a volunteer

  • FUCK YOU – GO FUCK YOURSELF – I DON’T WANT TO TALK TO YO

Bickley fabricates stories which border on delusional thought patterns.  

The list of the “great work” includes

  • Spearheading violations of the First Amendment by the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities

 

  • Spearheading the rule change and legislation to eliminate special certificates – essentially making it impossible for people with disabilities to have any sort of integrated/independent job within Seattle. 

 

  • While being non-binary and dogmatic in using pronouns of they/them (by the way, non-binary is not a disability) bickley, is unyielding in his binary labels of disabled vs “the abled” 

 

  • Bickley and the whole Seattle Disability Commission should be gutted and started with a fresh set of people who do not have the extreme biases, hate speech and abuse the current commission roster chooses to utilize.  

 

Let’s get some people who know how to collaborate and work together and really break barriers-

Not this renegade group of activists. 

Guardians are not the “bad guys”

As a parent and guardian of my young adult son with complex developmental disabilities which include an intellectual disability, I am continually made aware of the “fact” from trained self-advocates that my opinion has nothing to do with what may be best for my son and that, as a guardian, I am only self-serving.  Also, since I do not have a developmental disability myself, I have no knowledge of what it is like to live with a developmental disability – more specifically an intellectual disability.

I fully support trained self-advocates in their mission to advocate for a meaningful life experience and to shape public policies to which affect the lives of people with developmental disabilities.  I do not believe that the trained self-advocates have a full understanding of the needs and supports that people with complex, profound or intellectual disabilities (IDD) would choose.  I also do not believe that these trained self-advocates understand the issues of needing a caregiver 24 hours a day to assist with ALL aspects of daily living and how the guardian is involved in helping a person to have a meaningful life experience.

The legal guardian has a court-ordered responsibility to speak on behalf of and in the best interest of the person for whom they represent.  The guardian, together with other caretakers, and the person needing the supports work as a team and the guardian can be the spokesperson for the person with IDD.

I understand there are many people with IDD who are able to speak up and advocate for themselves and ask for what they need and that’s great. Unfortunately, just by definition of this particular disability,  only the people with the characteristics of “mild” ID may be able to live independently with minimal support and/or intermittent support during times of uncertainty.

Unless trained self-advocates are providing the day in and day out, 24 hour care needed by the people who experience  the “moderate,” “severe,” or “profound” characteristics of IDD, they have no concept of the needs, supports and choices that these people would make and have no right to speak on their behalf.  Since by definition, this population is unable to advocate for their needs and supports, the guardians, caretakers, family members, community members, healthcare providers, and friends who know the person best are the the most appropriate advocates for this population.

Denying guardians participation in advocacy on behalf of the people they care for is an act of discrimination against this population.  The slogan “Nothing about us, Without us” includes the guardians when they are speaking in the best interest of the person who they have the legal responsibility to make decisions for.

The table below clearly differentiates the severity categories in the classification of those diagnosed with intellectual disability.

clinical characteristics of Intellectual Disabilities

This discrimination is practiced by many organizations and advocates who claim they are advocating for those with disabilities.  In the response I received from Alex Clardy, Legislative Assistant for Seattle City Councilmember District 1 Lisa Herbold, it is clear they do not understand how this population communicates and the discrimination practices greatly limit the ability of the policy makers to fully understand how these issues will affect the people who work these jobs.

“The PwD Commission received no comment opposing the elimination of the subminimum wage certificates. Some people contacted Councilmember Herbold’s office concerned that people need the subminimum wage to get jobs.  Yet, no people with disabilities contacted Councilmember Herbold’s office to say so.  Since the PwD Commission, through their individual lived experiences, can speak to these issues best, Councilmember Herbold asked that I share with you excerpts from the PwD Commission letter that outlines several specific points as evidence against these concerns specifically and opposing the subminimum wage as a policy. “

( I will comment on the so-called “evidence” which the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities (PwD Commission) provided to the City Council in another blog post)

It needs to be noted that there are no representatives with IDD on the PwD Commission and they totally disregard the guardians and the collective experience of the guardians, caretakers, friends and community members of people with IDD.  The PwD Commission is exclusionary when it comes to people with IDD.

Another group – Self Advocates in Leadership has the following items in their 2018 legislative agenda:

Sail 2018 legislative agenda

Are they suggesting that supported decision making replace guardians?  Is this logical for the people who live with severe forms of IDD?

 

 

Elimination of Sub-minimum wage in Seattle

The Seattle Commission for People with disAbilities  has made a recommendation to the Seattle City Council to eliminate certificates which enable employers to pay people with specific disabilities a commensurate wage.  I know that there are discussions all across the country that are looking at issues of employment and wages for people with disabilities.

This is a quick update on this very heated discussion.  From what I can assume by the articles that I read and the correspondence I have had with at least two of the commissioners regarding this issue via Facebook,  there has been little research or collaboration with those in our community who may be, now or in the future, affected by this proposal.

Attempts to offer insight, requests for research, transition plans and funding plans have been ignored and people who expressed concerns have been rudely and aggressively mistreated by at least one of the commissioners.

Seattle Commission for people with disabiltiies Shaun Bickley and Cindi Laws

Below is the first letter that I submitted on the Facebook page.  This led to the Facebook page administrator blocking me from further comments or reacting to any posts – and this post was removed.

I am the parent and guardian of a young adult with significant intellectual/developmental and mental health disabilities – all of a degenerative nature and I network with many other families, caregivers, guardians and people with IDD who totally disagree with the assumptions that you and others are making about those with disabilities.

Yes, the members of the commission may have disabilities but is the specific population of those with significant intellectual/developmental disabilities represented?  The population which identifies as disabled is extremely heterogeneous and we need to have choices available to ensure that all have a chance and opportunity to work. We are all very concerned regarding this issues. For many of these people who work under these certificates, it’s not about making a living wage – it’s about having a job and being a member of the community, participating, sharing experiences and having daily goals and activities – basically adding meaning to their lives. 


Unfortunately, my son and others who experience some of the same types of issues he does, are not able to articulate their ideas, attend meetings, and speak in coherent sentences – even with the help of assistive technology, and so their voices are not heard. 


You do not speak for them – in fact, it is quite the opposite because you deny the people who know, love and understand them, the opportunity to provide their ideas and choices. These people are their friends, families, guardians, caregivers, coaches, case managers, co-workers. These are the people who are all better equipped to fill in and be a proxy for their voices. 


The fact that you make assumptions that you are speaking for all people with disabilities without taking into consideration those who are affected by this issue is an act of discrimination and devaluation of their personhood. 


We need these certificates to ensure choice – remember the saying “nothing about us, without us” – Please take it to heart!

Mr. Shaun Bickley, one of the commissioners, took offense with my letter, stating “”nothing about us, without us” refers to disabled people, not to parents, siblings, neighbors,  co-workers and other allies”.  He wrote that they (the commission) were all disabled and therefore can speak for all people with disabilities – whereas, guardians’ concerns are only self-serving.  He wrote that all people, even if they can just move one muscle, can make their choices known – regardless if others understand them or not.  (I am very confused by this since if others do not understand, how are their choices known?)

In looking at the members of the commission I noticed that several are lawyers, a few have PhDs and several others have a variety of advanced college degrees, one is a filmmaker and an artist,  one is a medical doctor  – I’m curious which one has an intellectual/developmental disability?  This is the question that got me blocked from the Facebook page as it was seen as using “degrading language and making people feel unsafe.”

More to come – letters have been sent to The Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities, the Mayor’s office, the Office of Labor Standards and to each member on the Seattle City Council.