Cost Breakdowns for RHCS – Most Cost Effective Care

With all the disastrous budget woes we are currently experiencing, now is not the time to irresponsibly start a social experiment with our most vulnerable citizens.  Looking through the reports for “Money Follows the Person” report for January – June 2010, (Mathematica Reference Number 06352.400)

It is clearly evident that we do not have enough resources for those already in the community – why would anyone even consider moving more people with more complex needs out of their safe, cost effective home?

These are quotes from the MFP report:

 

2/3 states reported difficulty reaching transition goals – listed in order of importance

  1. Shortage of affordable and accessible qualified housing
  2. Complex needs of the target population
  3. Transition candidates not choosing to reside in an MFP-qualified residence
  4. Family opposition, particularly among candidates with developmental disabilities.
  5. Shortage of slots in their HCBS waivers
  6. Contracting delays
  7. Cuts in the state budget
  8. Inadequate service capacity
  9. Lack of caregiver supports
  10. Staff turnover

 

Rates of reinstitutionalization : most common factors are:

l. lack of informal supports in the community

2. Lack of formal paid service or supports in the community

 

Emergency Calls for backup assistance:

34.9%  of calls were in response to direct service or support workers not showing up as scheduled

2.8%  were to address transportation to get to medical appointments

 

MFP continues to encounter systemic challenges related to state budget cuts, scarce housing options, limits imposed on Medicaid HCBS benefits and shortages of services and providers.

Washington reports that hiring freezes, furloughs and lay-offs have strained available staff resources and in some cases limited the MFP program’s ability to make timely transitions, conduct trainings, or perform outreach.

 

Given this very dismal picture of what life in the “community” is like – how could anyone advocate to move a person from their safe home into these unchartered waters?

The charts below indicate the actual cost to our state for the care in our RHCs.  This is the cost for comprehensive care with trained, stable staff.  This is what we need to maintain and expand on to keep our most vulnerable and challenging citizens safe and healthy in addition to sharing these services with those who already reside in another community setting.

 

 

 

 

 

How Can This Happen? DDD denies admission to RHCs

If this has happened to you or you know of someone who asked for or desired admission to one of our RHCS – PLEASE have them contact me.  We are trying to inform our legislature about the misleading information that DSHS, DDD, the DDC and The Arc advocacy groups among others are sending.  People do want our RHCs but the legislature is not hearing them – we need to change that!

Is there a monopoly on disability advocacy?

I’m outraged at the inhumane treatment that our most vulnerable citizens are receiving at the hands of some advocacy agencies and departments that are set up to protect these very citizens.  Not only is this segment of this population that is being ignored, their advocates that can speak for them are being banished from public discussions and stakeholder meetings.

There is a very active grassroots advocacy movement which  supports our most vulnerable citizens.  These people are dedicated beyond imagination, energetic, creative and innovative.  They have come up with many alternatives that will not only save money but enable more people to be served.  They want to share resources and expertise but their hands are tied by the monopoly that runs disability advocacy.

There is so much senseless nonsense being passed off as fact, yet if anyone questions it or asks for clarification, you are shunned.

I got a note from an executive director today in response to a question I had as to why I couldn’t comment on the public site.

This is his response:

Anyone is free to submit an article for consideration.  Articles we publish must be consistent with the values of the DD Act, namely self-determination, productivity, independence and integration/inclusion in all facets of community life.

We decided to have this blog under some editorial supervision because there is a lot of mis-information in the DD community which would not be helpful.  We hope to provide/publish information people can trust.

My response to him:

That is exactly my concern about this blog.  I believe that it is very biased in favor of those who can be self-advocates but does not address the needs of those who are not able to function at that level.

Within the population of people with developmental disabilities, there is a wide continuum of abilities.  Many of these people are not able to be their own self-advocates and where do these people fit into the scheme of this?  Many are in the community, many live in RHCs, but they are still people and their voices need to be heard.

When articles are written only from the perspective of people who can be self-advocates and what they are able to do and accomplish (I fully support them by the way) it really hurts the people who are not able to.  Also the family members of these people are made to feel like they are not the best advocates for their loved ones, that some agency “knows” better than the family.

These are my concerns and I don’t see how they can be addressed with out allowing something to be written with regards to them.

I fully believe that many of these agencies are good and do much great work but I also know that most do not advocate for the needs of my son and others like him.

How can we break down these walls and have a real discussion rather than being banished just like they are banishing our loved ones?


What is An Advocate?

An advocate speaks up for you, protects you, upholds you, helps you, supports you when you are not able to do it yourself.

RHCs and SOLAs – what are they?

Comprehensive Care for residents in a Residential Habilitation Center is the most cost-effective way to care for those with the greatest need and highest acuities.