National Council on Disability – Employment

The Arc of King County has a representative, known to harass and bully disabled community members and disability advocates speaking as a panelist at the upcoming National Council on Disability Quarterly meeting.

Why is the Arc of King County enabling this abusive person to continue in this role?  Please contact the Arc of King County and ask why they encourage this type of behavior?

PLEASE NOTE CORRECTION SENT OCTOBER 22, 2018 FROM NCD REGARDING CALL-IN PHONE NUMBER – ALSO LIMITS ON PUBLIC COMMENTS – THEY ARE NOT TAKING COMMENTS ON EMPLOYMENT

We apologize for posting the incorrect call-in for tomorrow’s board meeting in our earlier email. Please note the change below.

**CORRECTION**

NCD’s Council Members will meet tomorrow, October 23, in Jackson, MS, to receive presentations on its latest report, “New Deal to Real Deal: Joining the Industries of the Future,” including a consumer panel to discuss it. A lunch break will follow that panel. Following lunch, the Council will receive a series of presentations from a bioethics and disability panel on the topics of genetic testing and gene editing, organ transplant policy, the use of quality adjust life years to limit healthcare, and physician-assisted suicide. Following a brief break, the Council will next receive a presentation regarding involuntary institutionalization as a result of disasters. The meeting will then include a time for public comment on NCD’s bioethics topics, before concluding with a brief period for any unfinished business.

This meeting will occur in Jackson, Mississippi at the Hilton Garden Inn Jackson/Downtown, Triple C’s: Club, Crown, Coronet, 2nd Floor, 235 W Capitol Street, Jackson, MS 39201. Interested parties may join the meeting in person at the meeting location or may join by phone in a listening-only capacity (other than the period allotted for public comment noted below) using the following call-in information:

Teleconference number: 1-800-667-5617
Conference ID: 6973399
Conference Title: NCD Meeting
Host Name: Neil Romano.

CART:
A CART streamtext link has been arranged for this meeting. The web link to access CART on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 is:
https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.streamtext.net%2Fplayer%3Fevent%3DNCD-QUARTERLY&data=02%7C01%7C%7C7d1150d77ee243688cda08d6382a42b8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636758151489616659&sdata=qMb8Rlq3VyzCNmnOFNhNbAa1uV5%2BFHVtY2ZowthTxVA%3D&reserved=0.

Accommodations:
Those who plan to attend the meeting in-person and require accommodations should notify NCD as soon as possible to allow time to make arrangements. To help reduce exposure to fragrances for those with multiple chemical sensitivities, NCD requests that all those attending the meeting in person refrain from wearing scented personal care products such as perfumes, hairsprays, and deodorants.

AGENDA: The times provided below are approximations for when each agenda item is anticipated to be discussed (all times Central):

Tuesday, October 23

9:00-9:15 a.m.–Welcome and introductions
9:15-9:45 a.m.–Executive reports
9:45-11:45 a.m.–“From the New Deal to the Real Deal: Joining the Industries of the Future” national disability employment policy and  consumer panel
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.–LUNCH BREAK
1:15-3:15 p.m.–Bioethics and disability policy panel
3:15-3:30 p.m.–BREAK
3:30-4:15 p.m.–Involuntary institutionalization as a result of disasters policy panel
4:15-4:45 p.m.–Town hall to receive comments about bioethics and disability (The five areas NCD is conducting research on include: organ transplants; medical futility; Quality Adjusted Life Years; physician assisted suicide; and genetic testing.)
4:45-5:00 p.m.–Unfinished business
5:00 p.m.–Adjourn

Public Comment:
NCD will receive public comments limited to those regarding NCD’s bioethics and disability research areas–organ transplants; medical futility; Quality Adjusted Life Years; physician assisted suicide; and genetic testing. To better facilitate NCD’s public comment, any individual interested in providing public comment is asked to register his or her intent to provide comment in advance by sending an email to PublicComment@ncd.gov with the subject line “Public Comment” with name, organization, state, and topic of comment included in the body of your email. Full-length written public comments may also be sent to that email address. All emails to register for public comment at the quarterly meeting must be received by 5  p.m, EDT, Tuesday, October 22, 2018. Priority will be given to those individuals who are in-person to provide their comments during the public comment period. Those commenters on the phone will be called on per the list of those registered via email. Due to time constraints, NCD asks all commenters to limit their comments to three minutes.

More Information:
If you have any questions about this meeting of the Council, please contact Anne Sommers at asommers@ncd.gov.

 

Screenshot (63)

Tune in on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 at 7:45 AM to listen to the panel (CALL-IN NUMBER:  800-667-5617, Conference ID: 6973399; Conference Title: NCD Meeting; Host Name: Neil Romano) have a discussion regarding

National Disability Employment Policy, From the New Deal to the Real Deal:

Joining the Industries of the Future

I am anxious to hear the comments of Shaun Bickley, representing Arc of King County, regarding his activism in Seattle which led to the elimination of the special certificates.

I wonder how Bickley will address the fact that he withheld critical information from the City Officials, falsified information, negated the research and report done by the National Council on Disability, bullied and harassed other disability self advocates and community members, refused to allow public comment on city websites of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities or that 7 of the 8 employees in Seattle personally affected by this law had their work hours reduced.

Will Bickley be accountable to the problems that have been raised by community members?

NCD Quarterly Meeting Agenda October 2018 – Shaun Bickley, Arc of King County, as panelist

I will be submitting a public comment – if you are so inclined to do so, the information from NCD is provided below.

 

 

PUBLIC COMMENT: To better facilitate NCD's public comment, any 
individual interested in providing public comment is asked to register 
his or her intent to provide comment in advance by sending an email to 
PublicComment@ncd.gov with the subject line ``Public Comment'' with 
your name, organization, state, and topic of comment included in the 
body of your email. Full-length written public comments may also be 
sent to that email address. All emails to register for public comment 
at the quarterly meeting must be received by Monday, October 22, 2018. 
Priority will be given to those individuals who are in-person to 
provide their comments during the public comment period. Those 
commenters on the phone will be called on per the list of those 
registered via email. Due to time constraints, NCD asks all commenters 
to limit their comments to three minutes. Comments received at the 
October quarterly meeting will be limited to those regarding NCD's 
bioethics and disability research areas--organ transplants; medical 
futility; Quality Adjusted Life Years; physician assisted suicide; and 
genetic testing.

Magical Thinking

Reading the news today that Alaska has banned sub-minimum wage and the kudos of the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities about this makes me think that these folks have magical or wishful thinking.  The illogicality of these decisions would be amusing if they were not so devastating for people and so consequently, I get very angry rather than laugh.

Robert Dinerstein, a law professor at American University and director of the school’s Disability Rights Law Clinic is quoted as saying “One approach has been to give workers a job coach, who goes to work with them during their first month on the job and helps them learn the ropes.”  I’m curious what will happen to those who need to have 1:1 support in order to be employed – do they just get to work for that one month and then lose their job?

Clearly Dinerstein has no clue about the level of supports that many who do work in sheltered workshop or those who work under a sub-minimum wage certificate need.

I have been at odds with the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities over their recommendation that the sub-minimum wage be banned in Seattle.  I asked several times to see the research that they claimed they did regarding sub-minimum wage and finally I was given their “research” – some reports and a couple of letters – non that were specific to the issues in Seattle.  In fact, the information in the reports was very clear that in undertaking the elimination of sub-minimum wage there needs to be a transition plan in place and the transition needs to take place over several years, maybe 10 or more in some instances.    It is embarrassing as a citizen of this city that such major decisions can be made without evidence based research and opportunities for those affected to provide their input.  What happened to “Person Centered Planning” and “Nothing about us, without us?”  It appears they don’t matter to the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities.

There are multiple reports and research with evidence based practices that can help to make a transition from sheltered workshop or sub-minimum wage to supported employment for those who chose this.  This option is not for everyone and can be very expensive and requires collaboration with many involved entities.

New Hampshire seems to be doing quite a bit of research and work to improve supported employment for residents.  There was a comprehensive plan on evidence based supported employment and a new, transparent data collection process.  There are reports issued every 6 months – this is the report for December 2016

NH employment data July 1 2016 through Dec 31 2016

Researchers from George Washington University did a case study of the transition from sheltered workshops to integrated employment in Maine.  To more fully understand the needed supports and the experiences of those involved, this report is very informative and does highlight the fact that when people leave the sheltered workshop, many work fewer hours per week and make less money than if they remained in the sheltered workshop.

Transitions - Sheltered Workshops

I do not support closure of sheltered workshops nor elimination of sub-minimum wage jobs that are allowed under the 14c certificates.  In addition to providing job support, working in a sheltered workshop can provide much more to the employee to enhance their quality of life and provide meaningful opportunities than many would be able to experience in an integrated supported employment setting.

We need to protect choice and opportunities together with person centered planning.