Is this “Community Inclusion?”

Seven months of trauma/crisis care and the crisis continues.

Kevin on a rid

Kevin is 26 years old and autistic.  He had been living in a supported living group home for 4 years after living at Fircrest for several years.  He started to have some behaviour issues develop in August 2018.  His psychiatrist attempted to adjust his medications but there were no positive results.  It was discovered that Kevin had elevated ammonia levels due to medication and this is what instigated the behaviour changes.

These behavior changes caused Kevin to assault his caregivers and a housemate.  The police were called, Kevin was handcuffed and taken to the hospital ER several times in the first 3 months of these changes. In November 2018, Kevin was hospitalized for 5 days due to self-injurious behaviors.  He then returned to his group home.

Two month later, on January 7, 2019, Kevin became anxious, hit a caregiver and a housemate – police were called and again Kevin was handcuffed and taken to the Secure Emergency Care Unit (SECU) .  Kevin was in a room with 4 other patients in the SECU – a unit that is critically important for the healthcare of our community but not the place to hospitalize an anxious person with autism. Kevin was very, very upset, cried and wanted to go home.  The group home stated that he was not allowed to return.

Kevin’s family took him to their family home but within 2 days Kevin became more and more upset because he wanted to go to HIS HOME.  His parents were unable to calm Kevin down and they were forced to call 911 for assistance.  Kevin again went back to the SECU for a night before he was transferred to a medical unit where he stayed from January 10, 2019 through February 20, 2019 when Kevin’s family was so devastated by the trauma he was experienced by being restrained chemically and physically in the hospital they attempted to take him home.

The home visit started out well but within a couple of days, Kevin became more and more anxious, wanting to go back to HIS HOME.

“The owners of the group home came yesterday and I think he was thinking he was going to his group home yesterday or today and that took him to the breaking point. No big changes, he just doesn’t want to be here anymore. He asked for his favorite caregiver all the time.

We just don’t know what else to do. It is such a sad situation. The group home owners told us they don’t want Kevin back until he gets his medications and behaviors fixed by the Fircrest team. DDA people are telling us there are no beds. Kevin is trapped in this mess and his father and I don’t know how to help him anymore!! 😢

Kevin again was admitted to the SECU about February 27, 2019 where he remains today.

The plan that DDA has come up with now is to find a place to have a respite bed and Kevin will be able to stay there from March 11 – March 28, while DDA helps the group home look for a house.  If Kevin does not have any behavior issues during this time he will be able to go to the new house if it is ready – if not, well – let’s not go there and let’s assume DDA will be able to provide the community supports that Kevin needs.
Kevin mowing the lawn

Please put pressure on our legislators to fund community supports – years of cuts in addition to understaffing and underpaying caregivers in addition to greatly underestimating the necessary funding for services and supports has led our state (and others) on a rapid downward spiral.

It’s time to pull ourselves out of this mess, understand the choices and needs of those we support and be realistic with funds and services.

 

Kevin – 34 days trapped, restrained, drugged and traumatized in a hospital

Why is traumatizing an autistic man allowed to happen?

How is Kevin going to heal from this abuse?

drug addiction

Kevin’s 33rd day in a hospital room. (Now it’s 34 days as of Feb 13, 2019)

The last 4 days Kevin has become increasingly desperate. The nursing staff at the Medical Care Unit where he is are such a great group of professionals. They have tried to keep him occupied, even taking him on wheel chair rides around the floor, but each day that passes he grows more restless. Kevin is a 5 year old (6’2” tall) that wants to go back to his safe/familiar room, surrounded by his things. He also wants to go for hikes, to the store, the movie theater, and the library. Now he is hitting himself in the stomach and legs with such force that his legs and abdomen are completely covered with purple and black bruises. This is the only way that he can deal with this overwhelming stress. He is limping because he hurt his left leg during the self-injuring actions that now are happening continuously throughout the day. Yesterday he became increasingly anxious with each passing hour, pleading for his “Bellingham house”. He began to scream, hit his room door and window and security was called. Kevin hit his RN and one of the security guard during the incident when they attempted to keep him safe in his room. Throughout the day he was heavily medicated with no success. At night, he managed to escape from his room and run downstairs to the hospital lobby and then outside where he was wrestled by security until Bellingham police arrived.
After he was guided back to his room by the police he was finally medicated with an IM injection of B52 (Benadryl/Haldol/Lorazepam). He has been asleep since then, in a way I feel this is better for him to stop his mental anguish and physical self-inflicted pain.

This situation is a disgrace, my child deserves better from our system. He will severely injure hospital staff or will be gravely injured by medication administration and/or being restrained.

Please contact legislator:
Sharon Showmake at 360 7867854
Luann Van Werner at 360 7867980
Doug Erickson at 360 7867682

Plead for my son to be able to go to a respite bed where he can have physical activity outside of his room, He is unable to comprehend what or why this is happening to him. He needs a less restrictive environment where he can feel free and safe.
please feel free to share!

Marcia Alspaugh

Cost of Deinstitutionalization

A quick review of the hospital data from the Washington State Hospital Association provided the information below.  Granted this is far from a thorough review of the information but it does provide some insight into the problem that has been addressed by the DD Ombudsman and the recent issue at Mason General Hospital regarding the “dumping” of people with IDD at the hospitals when community care providers are unable to provide the contracted care.

This data is only for numbers of people discharged (therefore does not include people in the Emergency Departments or people that were on “observation”).  It also does not state the reason for admission but does report the service provided.  For my review, I chose the service “Organic disturbances and Intellectual disability”

June 2017 – June 2018

total discharges 967
average cost per discharge $75,332
average number of days for each person 20.3
average cost per day $3,709

Total cost for the year for these 967 people who were discharged was

$72.8 Million Dollars

Wow – think how much better spent that money would be and how much better off these people would be if that money was used wisely for a full continuum of care – meaning the RHCs, local crisis stabilization, respite and supported living

This waste of money is what the “deinstitutionalization” craze has caused.  Since these costs are not paid for from the DSHS or DDA budget, they are not counted in the cost of care for those with IDD – If I am wrong about this, please let me know and show me the sources.