Budget downsizes (closes) Fircrest

Write to your Washington State Legislators and the leaders of both chambers:
Senator Sharon Nelson, Senator Mark Schoesler, Representative Dan Kristiansen and Speaker Frank Chopp – remind them of the need for a continuum of care and remove these sections from the budget.

 

Dear Speaker Chopp,

I am a constituent and am writing to you with some concerns regarding ESSB 5048 – particularly Section 205 – Part 1 (K), Part 2 (C) and Section 206 Part 18.   I am also a registered nurse specializing in the care of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and a parent of a young man who recently transitioned from Fircrest to supported living in the community.

These sections state that appropriated funds will be  “provided solely for transitioning clients from Fircrest school residential habilitation center into community settings.” The clients from both the nursing facility and the intermediate care facility would be forced to move and it appears that this is a step towards closing Fircrest.

There are many concerns raised regarding attempts to close or downsize Fircrest through a budget proviso.  It is written in law (Olmstead v L.C. 1999)  and supported by CMS regulations that a person has a choice to live in an intermediate care facility.  In addressing the issue of changing care from an institutional placement to a community placement, there is a three part test to determine if community placement is appropriate:

  1. The State’s treatment professionals have determined that community placement is appropriate
  2. The transfer is not opposed by the affected individual and/or guardian
  3. The placement can be reasonable accommodated by the resources available to the State

If the above points are satisfied, then it is appropriate to have people move but I know that they are not met for the majority of the residents who live at Fircrest or other RHCs in our state.

It is important to address the crisis we have with community care before taking steps which would only increase the risk of harm to some of our most vulnerable citizens.

It is critical to keep our RHC communities open to best serve the diverse population of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Deinstitutionalization – Risks now outweigh Benefits

More horrible budget news today and I really don’t know what to say – how much more can we take?  People are already dying due to this crisis and the plan that Governor Gregoire put out today guarantees that more of our precious loved ones will die.

I am also continually shocked by the misinformation that our Governor is basing some of these disastrous decisions on.  Most notably is the false information that closing our Residential Habilitation Centers (RHCs) will save money.  The reality is that this will cost more money and more lives.  We have already experienced this in the process of closing Frances Haddon Morgan Center this year.

There has been one documented death so far.  There have been several injuries to residents and many of the residents who have transferred from Frances Haddon Morgan Center to Fircrest are experiencing difficulties.  It’s not only the residents who have transferred but the residents who were already living there are experiencing increased anxiety and behavior issues.

I cannot imagine what many people who are living in community homes must be feeling – fearing for their lives with no safety net there for support.

I have attached a chart which documents true costs of care in a variety of settings.  This data is taken from the DSHS EMIS report for December  2009 –  Dec 2010.  The data for the Supported Living Programs is taken from the Certified Residential Care Cost Reports that each agency must submit every year to DDD.  These are the 2010 reports.

Some very interesting data is clear:

The RHCs are THE MOST COST EFFECTIVE and COMPREHENSIVE care for some of our most vulnerable citizens.  This chart does not even include the cost of food, healthcare and most habilitation services for our citizens with disabilities.

Take a look and see – let me know if you have any questions.  Cost of Care Measure

Opinion published in The Stand Risks of Deinstitutionalization now outweigh benefits

It is also interesting to note the profits that many of these agencies make.  It would be great to use some of that money for improved services to more people.