“Allegations Unfounded” ?

Medication error rates of 52-89% on several medications is neglect.

Failure to apply splint correctly 85% of the time is neglect.

Neglect occurs when a person, either through his/her action or inaction, deprives a vulnerable adult of the care necessary to maintain the vulnerable adult’s physical or mental health. Examples include not providing basic items such as food, water, clothing, a safe place to live, medicine, or health care.

Signs of neglect. (from Washington State Department of Social and Health Services)

The above examples of error rates are just a few that have occurred to my son while living at a state operated intermediate care facility for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ICF/IDD).  These issues and others have been reported to the administration and there have been several investigations done and the conclusions returned have been “allegations unfounded.”  I find these conclusions indefensible given the documents that have been submitted for review.

One such issue that went on for several weeks started when my son developed swelling and pain in his right ankle – the ankle that had very recently recovered from a serious sprain.   The lack of response from the medical and nursing team from the very beginning of this injury being reported to the day I removed the splint was met with frustration. It was a very simple and straightforward issue that could have had a very simple and straightforward response – it turned into something totally different.

It was not until I was totally frustrated that I even mentioned the word “NEGLECT” and that is when the superintendent “self-reported” to Residential Care Services  (RCS) and the first investigation was done.  That investigation took several months to complete and the allegations were deemed unfounded.  During those months I was not allowed to talk with anyone at the facility regarding the care since it “was under investigation.”

This is a link to the email exchanges that I had with the Health Care Coordinator (HCC – RN), the Nurse Manager (RN4), the Habilitation Plan Administrator (HPA) and the ICF/IDD Superintendent.

neglect-with-foot-splint-at-fircrest-june-2015

splint-on-wrong-foot-upside-downsplint-on-left-foot-should-have-been-on-right-foot

 

Since that time, I have requested to have the issues investigated again and have provided more documentation to RCS.  I have felt as if I have been the one being investigated because each conversation that I have had with an investigator has started with what they have heard about me – trying to find issues with what I have reported or how I have acted.

The only thing that they have been able to say is that the photos that I have provided are not “proof” because I could have photo-shopped them.  Their “proof” is the documents and charting of their nurses and staff (which now have been found to be in error when trying to reconcile medications dispensed to medications documented as administered).  They have not and will not consider email correspondence or medical charts from outside medical providers.  They have not enlisted healthcare professionals to review the allegations of medical and nursing neglect until this very last investigation involving almost countless medication errors.  Yet, I am the one who is looked at for wrong doing.

In doing the research for these allegations I have learned that the Department of Health and therefore the Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission has no ability to investigate since they are not the licensing agency for the healthcare provided at the ICF/IDD.  Since the issues are systemic to the nursing care at the ICF/IDD it is up to the licensing agency to investigate.  Here is a link to the letter I received from the Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission – Discipline Section, Health Services Consultant.

dshs-needs-to-look-again-at-nursing-neglect

So, it’s back to the drawing board of contacting DSHS and asking for explanations of why the allegations are unfounded.

All residents are at risk of harm until these and other issues are acknowledged and corrected.

 

DD Ombudsman

Hopefully soon, Washington State will have a Developmental Disabilities Ombudsman.

This past year legislation was passed (thank you  Senator O’Ban,  the legislative champion for SB 6564, providing protections for the most vulnerable people from abuse and neglect) which will provide funds to develop The Office of Developmental Disabilities Ombudsman.

dd-ombudsman

There has been a great need for this type of oversight for all people with developmental disabilities but especially for those who live in an intermediate care facility (ICF).  While the Long-Term Care Ombudsman can help in situations for those who live in a skilled nursing facility, group home, assisted living or other long-term care facility, the Long-Term Care Ombudsman is not available to assist the residents in the ICF.

These residents have been without an adjudicator if concerns regarding their care  or other issue are not addressed appropriately.  This is especially true for those residents in a state operated ICF.  Without an independent authority to help mediate differences between the person and the state, these residents may not have had an objective investigation of their concerns.

Allegations of neglect and harm have been ignored or swept under the carpet by the state agency when conducting investigations of state facilities.  The DD Ombudsman will help prevent some of this injustice to our most vulnerable citizens.

I contacted the Department of Commerce last week to inquire into the development of the Office of the DD Ombudsman given that the bill was passed last legislative session.

Below is the response that I received from a spokesperson for the Disability Workgroup:

“A stakeholder meeting was held September 29th and written comments were accepted through October 15th.

I am currently drafting the solicitation to be released later in November. Evaluations of the bid responses will be in January 2017 and an announcement of the winning proposal probably in February 2017.

That organization will need to create the office, hire staff, train volunteers, etc. I anticipate them starting their ombuds duties sometime in the summer of 2017.

I hope this helps. Thanks for asking.”

Whistleblowing

Someone needs to speak up and I’ll keep speaking up until some of these serious issues of healthcare inequity are actually looked at and corrected

A recent blog posting entitled “The Journey of a Whistleblower: The Challenges, the Pains and the Price ” identifies some of the issues when one is faced with some ethical decisions.

While my son was a resident at a state operated intermediate care facility, I brought issues of concern to the administration and the medical director.  When no action was taken, I approached the Human Rights Committee of the facility.  They did not think that the issues of healthcare neglect and injury were a concern of theirs.  I then went to the advocacy group for the residents of the facility.  The president told me that their goal was only to keep the facility open – they had no say in assessing or measuring standards of care.

Obviously the healthcare and quality of life for the residents was not on the radar of any of these groups.

So, I keep trying to get people, organizations, legislators and agencies to see the serious concerns with medical and nursing care at some of these facilities.

If your loved one was dependent on the care provided in a healthcare facility, would it be important to know that all the prescribed medications and treatments were administered?  Or would it be okay for the nurses to only administer sometimes but document that all prescribed administrations were completed?

Would medication compliance rates of 11-46% be acceptable to you?  These rates are certainly not acceptable to me.

But it’s not just the low compliance rates I’m concerned about – it’s the years of falsified records across the board on a variety of medications by many nurses that is a huge concern.  Who is to know if the medications are really administered with so little oversight?

Who monitors medication administration – apparently no one and this is a major problem that needs immediate attention.

There is immediate jeopardy to all residents of the facility until the medication administration problems are examined and corrected. It is shameful on the part of our state agencies that these practices have been and still are accepted practice.

As a nurse myself, I know this practice is unethical and illegal to falsify these documents.  I question the level of integrity of the nurses working at this facility who routinely engage in this illegal activity.

This time has come to go outside the state organizations and inform others.  It is not just about keeping a facility open, it is about providing safe, quality care.  Care that is not happening at this time.

 

Healthcare at the Intermediate Care Facility

Who oversees the healthcare at the intermediate care facility for those with intellectual disabilities (ICF/ID)?  If you have a loved one who lives in an ICF/ID it may be worth looking into this to ensure that the healthcare actually does at least meet the minimum standard of care.

This was not the case in the ICF/ID that my son lived in.  I first started noticing problems the first year he lived there and I tried to work with the team and work within the system to improve the care, provide education and collaboration.  As system after system broke down and my son’s health grew worse I was making more and more trips to his home to provide the care and treatments that were supposed to have been provided by the nurses and team at the ICF/ID.

I knew the medications were not being applied but since the nurses were charting as given that was proof that the medications were being applied as prescribed. The fact that my son was not responding indicated that more potent medications were needed in addition to other medical treatments to control his inflammation.  These other treatments are not without risk and actually do increase his risk of cancer but we needed to get the inflammation under control and his immune system stabilized.

I was visiting at least 4 times a week and would apply his topical medications when I visited – knowing that he would at least be getting them when I was there.  They were actually supposed to be applied twice a day  and were charted as being applied twice a day but that is not what was happening.

After we moved our son to supported living and his care staff  applied the prescribed medications as ordered his inflammation quickly was controlled.  In about one month’s time the inflammation that had been extremely problematic for 3 1/2 years was now in total control.  His lab work was essentially normal after 3 1/2 years of having hematological problems. The medications actually did work – they were just not being administered as prescribed.

Now that I have the actual pharmacy and nursing records to review, I have found 9 medications that were falsely documented as being given for 1-3 years.  As a nurse I am totally appalled at the lack of quality and integrity that was accepted and not even questioned and do not understand how these dramatic errors can go unnoticed and uncorrected.

Below are charts of 5 of the medications showing the dates of administration, the amounts the pharmacy (at the ICF/ID) dispensed and the amounts that were charted as given. The compliance rates are unbelievable!  Who would accept these rates as meeting any type of standard of care? Why is this acceptable at the ICF/ID?

medication-1medication-2medication-3medication-4medication-5

It’s not just nursing that was the problem.  There was to be a 90-day medication review or reconciliation.  The purpose of this is to check each medication and ensure it is still needed and is indicated and the correct dose is prescribed.  Obviously the medication reviews were not done (but were signed off as being done)  since 3 of these medications were only needed for a short time (1 month or less) but remained in my son’s active  medication profile for up to 3 years dispensed and signed off as administered.   Who really knows what was given and what was just charted on as given.

How is one supposed to know if a medication is working or not when there is this type of record keeping?

There are so many problems that can be identified just with these medication errors.  This is at a state operated facility and so far the state investigation has stated that the allegations are unfounded based on the fact that the nurses charted the medications as given as ordered.

The state agency that oversees this facility is the Department of Social and Health Services.  Unfortunately, complaints to the Medical Quality Assurance, Nursing Quality Assurance, Department  of Health, Pharmacy Quality Assurance are unable to provide any guidance since they do not oversee any of the services at the ICF/ID.  It is up to DSHS and they do not see any problems.

Residential Care Services has opened up another investigation to review these issues and other allegations healthcare abuse and neglect.  My hope is that this time they will be able to see the problems and work on a plan for correction so that the residents do indeed have healthcare that at least meets the minimum community standard of care.  Currently that is not happening.